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chickens and oil Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Tuesday, July 01, 2003 5:37:09 PM
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Uhmm Pate, all that i can think would happen is that the chickens would be really lubed up well. ;) I remember giving vegitable oil to goats when they got some kind of sickness, and it cleaned them out. I think it will definately cause a intestinal purge. Not sure if that will hurt them. What i would suggest is to single out a sacrificial chicken, one that is not pulling her weight in the egg laying end ;) and test it out on her. Then you will get a good idea. Oh and it won''t take but a day or to to find out.
steve
You must be getting alot of bugs if your having a disposal problem. You can however compost the bugs.
Steve
pate20135
#2 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 4:13:27 AM
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Steve,

In my experience, bug shells do not compost. Second, one never puts grease or oil in a compost heap.

A neighbor, not the requester, is trying the ''oiled'' feed now.

Take care,

Pate

skruzich
#3 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 2:09:14 PM
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uhhhh ooops :) I wonder why the bugs won''t compost. I know right now after last night, I would love to have a super chicken that killed off these *)@)#_$_ mosquitos!!!!!
My legs look like i have chicken pox on them from walking out to pick berries
mikeg
#4 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 8:01:58 PM
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You could probably feed the bugs to cat fish in a pond if you have one near. I am going to try the oil and water thing this week the beatles are back.
mikeg
#5 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 8:06:11 PM
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Steve are you sure they are mosquitos and not chiggers or heaven forbid turkey ticks.
skruzich
#6 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 8:14:44 PM
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No they are skeeters! ;) They have wings and a long sucker that they just love to plunge into your hide and suck blood. we have had alot of rain this year and they are becoming a problem. I guess if i am ever going to get west nile virus i will have it in a few days. They just ate me alive last night. Guess they were celebrating for the fourth a little early.
Never seen a turkey tick before, we have deer ticks and those little flat brownish ticks that hang off the pine tree branches. But so far this year i haven''t found one on me or my dogs.
Chiggers aren''t bad because my briars are along my fence that ihave to keep my pets contained and i cut the grass around both sides. They are in a old flowerbox i built with timbers and when i hauled the dirt to fill it a few years ago the roots came along with the dirt and started growing blackberries.
They spread about 8 feet a year with new growth so next year this is going to be one righteous patch! Plus i put about 100 pounds of cow manuer on the area about 2 years ago.
This year though i guess because of all the rain, these berries are 4 times the normal size of the berries i get off of the briars. I picked about 1/2 gallon in 5 minutes last night.
pate20135
#7 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2003 11:37:40 PM
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Mike,

http://www.thelitterbox.org/pates/i-biby/.

Two hundred range. Some bug traps.

I was holding back until I knew for certain I had preprint/republishing rights.

Take care and enjoy,

Pate
mikeg
#8 Posted : Friday, July 04, 2003 12:33:01 AM
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Steve, turkey tick probably the same as deer tick I have heard them called seed ticks very small look just like a regular tick but about 1/10th the size or less. They are just visible they seem to bite you several time and develope the same as a chigger every where they bite and last several months. They eventualy will attach like a regular tick. I have to wipe down with alchol after a shower to get them off and clean the bites.
skruzich
#9 Posted : Friday, July 04, 2003 1:20:54 AM
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ewwww thats one creature i have no idea what its purpose is for except to be a pain. That and skeeters.
Steve
pate20135
#10 Posted : Saturday, July 05, 2003 10:42:20 PM
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The ''sacrificial'' bird is dead. Guess I have my answer. Diahrerra.

Steve, I stumbled across something else today, they found ancienct compost heaps in Egypt. The bug shells still intact. I thought of crushing, but now realize not effective. And now my proof is staring me in the face.


Ah well,

Take care,

Pate
StreetLegal
#11 Posted : Tuesday, July 08, 2003 4:29:33 PM
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Steve, I wish I could trade you some of my pecans for some of your blackberries!
skruzich
#12 Posted : Tuesday, July 08, 2003 7:13:19 PM
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What is the bugshells composition? To last that long in a compost heap, those shells must have a material that could be processed and used hehe. :)

Street, if they would make it to your house that wouldn''t be a problem. But i am afraid that they wouldn''t last through the mail. BTW Where are you????
I love pecans! I live in georgia and they have just about cut all the pecan trees down and put subdivisions in there. What a waste of excellent property and trees. I was so mad too, they just dozed down 500 pecan trees that were at least 100 years old, and then piled them up and burned them. They wouldn''t let me go in and cut some of the wood and use it.
I was told that if they couldn''t make a profit off the wood that no one could have it.
What a greedy bunch!

I would have loved to make some furniture out of that wood.

pate20135
#13 Posted : Tuesday, July 08, 2003 10:58:07 PM
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Steve,

I don''t know what makes bug shells so special. And to find out would be a lifes work. Want me to contact the OOMCC and have a youth selected? Ready to wait, oh, twenty years for an answer? Best I would be able to do. (sad smile)(I never claimed our system was perfect!)

I do have another cross reference, that has some interest. As thee knows some societies eat bugs. The human digestive track seems to, ''take care of'' the shells. I don''t care to eat the shells just to break them down... I will ''pass''. (grin)

I also note that chickens have no such trouble breaking down the shell, digestively.

On the pecans, that does hurt. Plant some. I know, that sounds a ''bit far'', but think of the future generations. I suspect thee, like me, spent a lot of time up in those trees.

As to the greed, nothing new there. ''throwaway society''. Be part of the fix.

Well, returning to the thread, I have to do more research into ''no-oil'' traps. The bugs do make great chicken feed, but providing such as cheaply and simply as possible is going to require some more skull sweat. BTW: Saxon published a ''grow your own flies'' thing. Facinating reading, even if I think his figures are off. I may actually become a ''fly farmer''. The way life twists, Ya?

Take care,

Pate
StreetLegal
#14 Posted : Tuesday, July 08, 2003 11:19:22 PM
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Steve, I''m in New Mexico...and yes, shipping blackberries would be tough. Maybe you could make me some fine blackberry wine instead? :)

They make pesticides that kill by breaking down the exoskeleton of bugs, so apparently the chemical composition of the exoskeleton is known (at least by someone).
skruzich
#15 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 12:10:34 AM
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hehe, pate, i will pass on the getting a youth and waiting 20 years. i probably won''t be alive in 20. Planting pecan trees is a good idea, now i have to find some land to plant on. My little ole acre and a half isn''t enough. :( I really need at least 5 acres to do something like that.
May be one day i can. I remember my uncle planting 5 acres of pecan rees years and years ago, and 90% of them died over the years. He ended up selling his property cheap in the end.
I plan on planting a couple on my property up in blairsville. Along with other trees.
Street, I have never made blackberry wine. Not sure if i can make any that is palitable. I do however make lots of blackberry jam and cobblers ;) Heck i am sending my son in the Marine Corp 2 jars of jam and a tin of chocolate chip cookies.
But let me look around and see what i need to do to make some wine ;) and I will try this year.
steve
andydufresne
#16 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 12:15:02 AM
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steve:

A friend of a friend told me of a man she knew when she was younger. He gave all his kids something like 20 acres completely planted in pecans except for a spot in the middle for a house. His idea was that all of them could if they chose make a living from selling pecans.
skruzich
#17 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 1:08:24 AM
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Wow andy, that was a fella that had it going for himself. I wonder if the kids ever did anything with the places.
andydufresne
#18 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 1:23:26 AM
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The last she heard about it the whole family would go out in the fall and gather up enough pecans to sell. But imagine growing up knowing that if worst came to worst you could go back to the land that was YOURS and earn a living.
skruzich
#19 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 4:43:01 AM
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Heh, its more than i have right now. ;)
steve
andydufresne
#20 Posted : Wednesday, July 09, 2003 4:58:31 AM
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PATE:

BTW Ihave used a similar trap for fleas in the house. Only I used soap on the water...caught a LOT of fleas that way.
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