Logged in as: Anonymous Search | Active Topics |

condensation Options
DanR
#1 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 2:03:07 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Greenknight:

Yes a greenhouse "can" add humidity to a house. However, you need to look at where all the water is coming from in your current house. Fans to vent a bathroom will reduce overall humidity in a house as will an air conditioner. Is the condensation bad in the winter? Or is it bad just in the summer? Most houses up your way add humidity in the winter. So pattern you condensation problems and I feel you will see the solutions.
Greenknight
#2 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 3:24:50 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Mostly, it is in the winter, we open windows alot more in the summer.
mikeg
#3 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 3:28:53 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
If you house is on a crawl space moisture can rise from there if it is not vented properly. Cooking will increase moisture as will a clothes dryer if not vented properly. If your house is built to tight it can also add to the problem.
Greenknight
#4 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 3:56:51 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
so your saying, venting is the solution? Is there someway, i could vent it a room, and condense into a pool?
DanR
#5 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 6:18:46 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Greenknight:

You may need to have your current house looked at by a professional in the HVAC field. In the winter the ambiant humidity is very low. If you are finding it a problem there has to be more to it than the information you have provided indicates. A vapor barrier in a crawl space will help. Vent fans for a given room, such as a bath room, will also help. But if you have enough water to add to a pool, especially in winter, then the problem must be very bad. Even here in the "Sunny South", we have low humidity in the winter. Buy a hygroscope and keep a record of the humidity in your house. That will begin to show you where and when the real problems are. If you can provide more info, please do. Such as, basement or crawl space, type and amount of insalation, type of HVAC system, ect. These will help.
Greenknight
#6 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 2:08:32 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
We have a vent in the bathroom, and a basement. We have dehumidifyer we use. Anyway, we live a new house, and it''s very tight insulation wise and since in the winter we close up the house and that''s when we have the problems. We''ll you get the picture.
andydufresne
#7 Posted : Thursday, June 12, 2003 7:20:19 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
WHERE are you noticing the condensation?
DanR
#8 Posted : Thursday, June 12, 2003 2:24:19 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Greenknight:

Is the condensation on the windows in the winter? Do you have an air to air heat exchanger to use in the winter? Some new houses are built too tight. It sounds more like a HVAC problem than a true humidity problem. Remember, humidity is a function of the temperature. The colder the temperature the less water it can hold. That is why, especially up where you live, humidifiers are added to the HVAC system for use in the winter. If it is 10 degrees outside with 50% humidity, then when you bring the same air inside the humidity will drop as the temperature goes up. It is almost a 1% drop in humidity for every degree rise in temperature. It may be that your house is too tight and you need to add some form of ventilation for the winter.
andydufresne
#9 Posted : Sunday, June 15, 2003 5:58:02 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Dan,

That was along the lines I was thinking of.

It could be that a small dehumidifier will solve the problem. LACK of humidity is not something we suffer from in Arkansas.

[:D]
Greenknight
#10 Posted : Monday, June 16, 2003 3:06:43 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Yes, yes it does gather on the windows and yes we do have humidifier. Maybe it''s just we need to run it longer.
Greenknight
#11 Posted : Monday, June 16, 2003 3:16:00 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Anyway, here''s what I''m wondering. Right now, I''m thinking eventually, that what I should do is, when i''m ready to build is, build a garage a metal garage, and add a room on to the side. That one room can later become the living, dining room for the rest of the house. Then when i want a green house, add that on to the front of the building, and add a some rooms on to the side. I figure it will take me a year to save up for the land. Then a year for the garage, and another year for the house or maybe I can do the garage and house together. I don''t know
andydufresne
#12 Posted : Monday, June 16, 2003 3:18:17 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! If you have a HUMIDIFIER we now know where your moisture is coming from. Humidifiers put water INTO the air, DE-humidifiers take water out. If you have condensation on the windows it shows you have more than enough water in the air.

I went out to dry a carpet in a lady''s house. Back in the days when that was all we did. (Now we check sheetrock and insulation etc etc) 3 Days into the project it was not getting any dryer. THEN I found what I thought was a second thermostat. It was the HUMIDIFIER control. She had it all the way up. As I was pumping water out of the air she was pumping just as much into it. Turned off the humidifier and it dried in a day.
bushwack
#13 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2003 5:15:08 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Pardon my interruption but in an earlier post he does say they DO use a dehumidifier
But now I guess a double check IS IN order.



quote:
Posted - 2003 Jun 11 : 08:08:32 AM
We have a vent in the bathroom, and a basement. We have dehumidifyer we use. Anyway, we live a new house, and it''s very tight insulation wise and since in the winter we close up the house and that''s when we have the problems. We''ll you get the picture.
Greenknight


Greenknight;

Do you remover a pan of water from the unit{DEhumidifier}?
Or add water to it, a {{Humidifier}}?

That would be unless yours is a larger built in system then I would guess it would be plumbed in .


Greenknight
#14 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2003 3:53:36 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
sorry, it''s my mistake, we''re using a dehumifier, (steve looks embarresed)
andydufresne
#15 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2003 5:31:32 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
WHEW! Ok you should go to Radio Shack or somewhere like it and get a digital hygrometer. They are not very expensive and will give you temp(sometimes indoor and out) and humidity in side. Mount it on the wall where you are having the prolem. That way you can monitor the humidity. When we are drying a house we have to use a chart to determine the acutal amount of water in the air. Humidity only tells you how much of a percentage of water the air can hold. Using that same chart we can calculate the dew point and we do our darnedest to stay away from that.

If you keep the air moving and the de-humidifier on that very well could solve your problem. You should be able to set the dehumidifier to stay on constantly. You may not need THAT and you don''t want it to get too dry. Keep in mind you may always have condensation on windows. As long as it''s not too severe or happening on the walls or draining down onto the walls it might not matter. IF you are experiencing MOLD then be cautioius. I think a lot of the things being said are overblown BUT to a person that is sensitive to it Mold can be deadly.

Keep us up to date on what happens with it.
Greenknight
#16 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2003 5:31:32 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Okay, the house live in now has problems with condensation, if i someday build a new house, then and have a greenhouse, having a greenhouse will make it worse. I live in the wisconsin climate, so we get lots of water up here. Just wondering how to comment this problem.
Users browsing this topic
Anonymous
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.





Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.