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basic plumbing 101 Options
JAK
#21 Posted : Monday, July 10, 2006 8:24:25 PM
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You could also use a marine toilet (head), where you open a valve and pump the bowl full, do your thing, open another valve and pump the water in and out, and then close a valve and pump the bowl dry. Where you are close to the ocean it will be also in keeping with a nautical theme you might be going for. I am not sure of any advantage other than that. If the drain gets fouled you can often pump it clear, but if it gets really clogged and you try and pump it the (system edited) will fly everywhere, even before it hits the fan. Might work for you though. You might also want to use salt water for that nautical smell. Not sure how far up you are.

http://www.fishing-catalog.com/heads/index.htm
http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm
http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/04.htm
jdcox
#22 Posted : Monday, July 10, 2006 8:33:07 PM
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I confess to not having much of a theme in mind as I do what I do on the ol'' John. Although sometimes I hum a few a tunes to create a kind of white-cum-blanket-over noise camoflauge.
You are quite the sensitive and decorative person to suggest it.
I am now toying with employing a Poopeye theme.
JAK
#23 Posted : Monday, July 10, 2006 8:41:49 PM
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Well they are loads of fun. Growing up the one on our boat was affectionately called the third mate.
I am not sure who the second mate was. I just know I was outranked.
jdcox
#24 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 5:27:11 AM
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Just heard back from Sun Mar. ''No way'', they said. ''Reimbursement is against our policy''.
Well, it''s hard to get your money back when they say, ''NO''. So, I''ll just chronicle the story exactly as it played out. Let the public decide.

Suggestion to any possible composting toilet buyers. Ask about their refund policy. And remember: to give a composting toilet a fair chance at doing what it is supposed to do, you have to give it a few weeks or so. Meaning: estimate the time from making the purchase to setting it up, to letting it ''digest'' and then ''trying a few fixes'' and see if that isn''t a sufficiently long time to void any warranty or reimbursement policy.
JAK
#25 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:12:03 AM
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I think when I get a composting toilet I will build it myself, very basic.
Then at least I will only have to be dealing with my own (system edited).
12vman
#26 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:08:36 PM
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JAK..
Here''s a starter prototype design.. :)

http://img32.imageshack.us/img32/4705/20040822football00043vl.jpg
practicalman45
#27 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:29:35 PM
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Hey, JD, I do know some folks over on Gabriola Island (sort of in your neck of the woods) that have made their own composting toilet. Their''s is just an outbuilding sort of thing that fills up plastic drums. Those are capped and rolled aside, and replaced with alternating drums. The full ones are set outside for up to two years before being emptied into their garden compost pile. The garden beds are aged and used for a couple more years before being allowed to grow any root crops. They are able to manage a pretty good garden, despite it being very thin soil on bedrock. Other folks I know have "two holers". One side is used till full, then sits and decomposes while the other side is being filled. Those are sort of raised buildings over cement "tanks" with vent stacks. You climb the stairs into the "two hole room". There''s windows for solar heat. They need to be used a certain way. Sawdust is added, and moisture levels are maintained. After several years idle, the alternating chambers are emptied and the contents used to make enriched soil around orchard trees.
JAK
#28 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:28:37 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by 12vman

JAK..
Here''s a starter prototype design.. :)

http://img32.imageshack.us/img32/4705/20040822football00043vl.jpg

Definitely in need of the woman''s touch.
You could at least add the matching planter. [:)]

p.s. Good working prototype though.
jdcox
#29 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:08:46 PM
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That ''toilet-cum-bucket'' is the virtual twin of what we used for two years while building the house. It works, of course, but no amount of ''women''s touch'' will make it better. Mind you, I just placed ours on a rock near the sea and, while enjoying a fabulous view, I was, now and then, part of the view for passing boats. More than I once I waved and moved at the same time.
skruzich
#30 Posted : Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:31:06 PM
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rotflmao, that would be one hell of a kodak moment
JAK
#31 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:05:11 AM
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Do you mean ''move'' as in bowels, or as in scurry?
hunter63
#32 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:12:17 AM
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Jd:
Had an out door "hooter" in a Colorado hunting camp, deep pit, bored down and a 1/2 55 gal drum on top. Had sides and a roof frame, but was just canvas covered.

Took your rifle with you as you would never know what would come by. Deer, elk, bear.
Always thought that would have been a Kodak moment, but the boats beat that.
JAK
#33 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:25:02 AM
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I have a question about the 5 and 10 gallon buckets. I would like to stack them inside in winter to stay warm and finish composting. I was thinking of a vented lid also, using a flexible hose to a roof vent, for the one in use and the most recent.
For a cabin I am building a 10 gallon bucket might even last the winter, even with urine included. Might compost faster also. But I am wondering if the buckets should stay vented for a full year. I like the flexibility of being able to add more buckets, and just stack them all up against a wall until they are settled. I think they could all share a common roof vent.

Once they are full, how much do they weigh? How much do they settle?
Also, when can you seal them shut to sit for a year before using them to plant a tree?
JAK
#34 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:34:03 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by hunter63

Jd:
Had an out door "hooter" in a Colorado hunting camp, deep pit, bored down and a 1/2 55 gal drum on top. Had sides and a roof frame, but was just canvas covered.

Took your rifle with you as you would never know what would come by. Deer, elk, bear. Always thought that would have been a Kodak moment, but the boats beat that.
I have heard of people hunting that way. I have also heard of outhouses that you could fish from. I am not sure how successful the hunting and fishing really needs to be under the circumstances, but I would be curious to know about record trophies from such a position. Also gives "take a breath and squeeze" a whole new double meaning.
JAK
#35 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:46:30 AM
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Also curious if you could use wood ash instead of or in addition to sawdust or wood shavings. I have heard of wood ash being used in outhouses, as there was always an ample supply and it would be a good way to dispose of it. It doesn''t have much carbon however, mostly potash with some phosphorous. I was thinking perhaps it might be useful as a final top layer of the bucket. Perhaps an initial bottom layer also. Does anyone know what would happen if you had alternating layers that inclded wood ash?

practicalman45
#36 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 8:04:39 AM
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I think you need to be careful of using wood ash in composting applications. It is good for keeping the flies out of your privvy, but its quite alkaline, and will kill the bacteria that you want and need to promote to digest the waste for fertilizer. I use the ashes in the garden and around trees by sprinkling them around in winter when the rains wash them into the soil. The potasssium is high in hardwood ashes. It doesnt last a long time. It is soluble and leaches away pretty fast, so do it late each winter before the rains end. Put it on the soil, not your compost pile. Just dispose of your (hardwood) ashes by sprinkling them directly around the yard and garden when you empty the stove ash bucket. I save some for my neighbors with no stoves. You should not burn toxic things though like plastic or colored paper if you do that. Also, if you burn your bones in the stove, it adds phosphorous too.
JAK
#37 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 10:52:01 AM
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Good to know. Thanks. I had been spreading on the compost pile. The soil is very acid here so I will spread it around like you say, except around the blueberries which are acid freaks.
jdcox
#38 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2006 7:20:59 PM
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I was referring to the moving of my inner self JAK. Hard to scurry with your pants around your ankles.

Quick story: I poop on schedule. Bruce lives a few miles away by boat and works a few miles up the coast. He travels about 30 feet off shore as he rounds our point (Potty Point). He works to a schedule, too. His boat moves when my bowels did (we are in the house now and have a bathroom). He and I shared a ''moment'' WAYYYYYY too many times.

And so did the kayaking group that runs expeditions by our place in the summer............but that is another story. Suffice to say: there isn''t a private part of me that has not been seen by a kayaker at one time or another.

"Why?" Well, kayakers don''t make any noise. They just ''slip'' around the point and THERE THEY ARE!!! ALL 14 or 15 of them! Take a shower or take a ____t - even in the remote area here - and ''voila'', there they are.

So, I wave. Sometimes I wave my arm.
hunter63
#39 Posted : Sunday, July 16, 2006 1:42:17 AM
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.[/quote]I have heard of people hunting that way. I have also heard of outhouses that you could fish from. I am not sure how successful the hunting and fishing really needs to be under the circumstances, but I would be curious to know about record trophies from such a position. Also gives "take a breath and squeeze" a whole new double meaning.
[/quote]
Jak you got that right, then then again there were bear blinds, and bait blinds not to far from camp (about 1 mile, up and over to the other side of the mountain), so the rule was don''t leave camp without your rifle/handgun and your canteen (very dry up there.)
Sun-Mar Corp.
#40 Posted : Tuesday, June 07, 2011 3:33:25 PM
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Posts: 134,494

Thank you for your comments.  Sun-Mar toilets do work well when installed correctly.  When connecting the waste pipe to a central composter, we recommend that there should be a 1/8" - 1/4" drop per foot (3 °) if the composter is off set from the toilet.  If the slope on the pipe is any greater than the water will run ahead of the waste.  These instructions are included in the installation section of our manuals but if you do have questions, we do have trained service associates that would be willing to discuss your installation.   As the toilets are an ultra-low 1 liter flush, we do not recommend that the waste pipe be any longer than 20 feet.   

Since all composting toilets do rely on microbial activity to compost, they must be kept warm in order to function.  In temperatures below 55 ° F, the microbes will go dormant and all composting will slow or cease completely.   This being said, composting toilets may be used sporadically throughout the colder weather with no adverse effects.  If you will be using your toilet frequently or constantly throughout the cold seasons, you will have to keep it warm in order for composting to continue.   If you have any further questions or concerns, please call at our toll-free number 1-888-341-0782 Ext. 218 and we would be happy to assist you.

Your Sun-Mar Service Team

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