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I need advice on some important deciscions Options
davisonh
#1 Posted : Saturday, October 07, 2006 12:48:58 AM
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Depends on what kind of young man we''re talking about...there are many types.When do you finish,what are your interests and where do you live?..
The Naturalist
#2 Posted : Saturday, October 07, 2006 2:06:26 PM
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I''m still in high school and plan on going to college. Up until recently, I was planning to someday become a pharmacist; now I''m not quite sure what I will study in college. My basic life plan after finishing college is to get a good job and save money and as soon as I have enough savings buy land in the country, quit my job, and live off the land. [:D]

As for where I live, I currently live in Florida.

Logan
#3 Posted : Saturday, October 07, 2006 9:57:21 PM
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While alot of people may disagree with me I personally am not big on the college thing especially if you plan on doing the whole homesteading thing. Although it may be necesary sometimes. In my opinion if you are interested in doing that it may be better to learn a trade that might be a little more usefull after you have your homestead, ie electrical or carpentry which are both things you can learn without college. Also if you go to college you will end up oweing massive ammounts of money for the schooling.

The best answer is conservation. If you are able to minimize your bills it will be that much easier to save the money. If you are able to avoid a car payment that is $400 a month in favor of $75 a month for a used car then you will be able to save that other $325 a month over the next several years. My truck is in great condition and cost me only $2000. You can find many many ways of minimizing your costs in life. This is fairly easy and in my opinion much quicker than making more money. Another problem is that the more money you make, if you do not have good control of yourself, the more monye you will spend. If you are able to properly control your habbits and conserve your money, you will achieve your goal faster and be able to maintain it easier when you get to it.

Conservation is the way to go :)
Redneckn
#4 Posted : Saturday, October 07, 2006 10:56:45 PM
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I''d have to say go with the Pharmacist thing. Then when once you''r working, buy you a place and do it. You can still work and homestead. Depending on how serious you are about living off the land though. I mean, you can''t go in and fill ''scripts smelling like a bears butt or anything. If I were in your shoes, I''d become a pharmacist, buy some land, work and live off that land, the retire earlier than most people and dedicate myself to my land. I know that pharmacists make pretty good money as I have 2 friends that are pharmacists. He makes 125K a year, she makes about 75k a year. And she only makes that much less than him because she doesnt want to work retail. Either way, I''d have to say that in the meantime, I''d really look at what way(s) you want to live off your land and make some goals now. That way, as you mature you can start with little steps and work your way up to having everything you want the way you want to have it...
Just my opinion though.
Good luck.
skruzich
#5 Posted : Saturday, October 07, 2006 11:31:41 PM
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what do you do if you get hurt and can''t continue living off the land? It is physically demanding and very dangerous at times. With a education to back you up, you can still continue to live there and if necessary hire the heavy lifting done.
lgmadonna
#6 Posted : Sunday, October 08, 2006 4:10:14 AM
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I agree with Steve. Go to school and get an education. All the while, read everything you can about homesteading. Take as many electives the would prove benificial to homesteading. Go and explore the Ag building, the university greenhouses (can you voluneer there?). Visit the vet science department. Are there any studies in ag, vet sciences, forestry, etc that you can participate in? Do you absolutly have to major in Pharm? Why not agricultural sciences?

Also, learn a trade! Carpentry is excellent!
Go and get your degree! But dont gain any debt.

practicalman45
#7 Posted : Monday, October 09, 2006 5:54:13 AM
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I think for a homesteader degrees are unnecessary. I would pursue some trade that you can use in the country at your homestead to make your living. If you make a professional career that requires years of getting a degree, and then long years to pay off your education (perhaps while living in the city), you will be middle aged before you can pursue your homesteading goals. If you want to go for a degree? Pick something that works with your homestead goals. Be a livestock veterinarian instead of a plastic surgeon.

I haven''t regretted learning the welding trade. Its been my ticket to self-reliance and a rural lifestyle (of course, I''m self educated, and a jack of all trades, besides....) It took years to develop my niche here, but I''m happy doing what I do. Many folks are grateful that I''m here. No one asks me if I have a welding certificate degree, or some sort of license. They just know that I can do the job for them. I don''t need any licenses or permits. Experience and past accomplishments speak for themselves.

Don''t put off what you''d love to be doing until a later stage in life. Go straight for that now.
Dorene
#8 Posted : Monday, October 09, 2006 9:36:59 PM
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College usually leads to massive debt, and the pharmicist trade is a wonderful example. A lot of effort money and many pharmacies are still having to take out loans to underwrite their businesses because the government and insurance is not making it''s medicaid payments in a timely fashion. A trade, Electrician, welding, automotive. Carpentry would be good - but I don''t think they have schools for that now. It is on the job experience, which instead of paying for you get paid for.
The Naturalist
#9 Posted : Tuesday, October 10, 2006 3:53:10 PM
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I will probably go to college, though I''m still deciding on what to study. The reason is so that I can have a backup just in case something happened to prevent me from homesteading. If I someday find myself unable to continue to live off the land, I will definately appreciate having gone to college. Also, about the debts, my parents will be the ones paying for college, and neither of them had any debts from their education, even though my dad has a master''s degree. In addition, a bit of extra savings from a higher-paying job such as pharmacy could certainly help in getting a homestead established.


timfromohio
#10 Posted : Tuesday, October 10, 2006 5:39:13 PM
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Finish school first. Pharmacy is an excellent field to go in to - you work reasonable hours, can make an excellent living, and can get a job anywhere. Same goes for a CPA. Both will take a few extra years beyond a bachelors degree, but are well worth it. If you chose the pharmacy route, go for a Pharm D. right off the bat (I think most major programs have evolved to this anyway?). If you put the formal education off, it will only be more difficult to go back the older you get. If you''re truly interested in homesteading, you could get yourself set up easier and quicker working as a pharmacist than trying to do it from scratch making much less money. I know of several CPA''s that work from their homes, and one that works only during tax season. That''s why I suggested the CPA.

Bottom line, if you are going to invest the time in formal education, pick something that provides you a decent living, geographic flexibility, and is a function in society that is not easily outsourced. At the same time, while at school take advantage of opportunities there to learn skills you''ll find valuable later. Most major universities have craft centers where you can learn woodworking, pottery, etc. Most land-grant universities have excellent extension programs where you can learn a lot that is relevant to homesteading.

Let us know what you decide.
turtlehead
#11 Posted : Tuesday, October 10, 2006 6:12:44 PM
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Another career option would be veterinarian, but specialize in chickens, goats, pigs, cows, and horses rather than dogs, cats, lizards, and parrots.
timfromohio
#12 Posted : Tuesday, October 10, 2006 7:43:19 PM
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True, but vet school is longer and you won''t make as much as a pharacist. Would probably be a lot more fun.

John Stiles
#13 Posted : Saturday, October 14, 2006 7:35:40 PM
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you are on the right path, stay with pharming. Study up on homesteading and travel a bit to places you might want to live and check them out. Find a mate with similair intelligence, then hang on for the ride.
katydaly
#14 Posted : Friday, November 03, 2006 11:05:22 PM
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I always think college is a good idea, no matter what your future plans are. For me, college was where I grew up. I highly recommend staying at school, even if it is local for you, get a dorm or an apartment.

College is where I learned how to cook, do laundry, get along with all kinds of folks, including how to live in the same house with people who weren''t my obnoxious brothers, and where I learned how to be my own person. Classes were secondary to my education, but definitely useful as well.

It doesn''t matter what you study, study what interests you, and everything else will fall into place. If you really want to be adventurous, and mom and dad are paying for it, go to college out in the sticks somewhere, and homestead on a little piece of land. Maybe rent a house with an acre or 2 where you can have a garden.

Good luck! And please do keep us posted.
YooperGirl
#15 Posted : Sunday, January 07, 2007 12:56:55 AM
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That is interesting; I too plan to homestead, and I''ll be going to university about 20 miles from where I hope to live. I''m majoring in environmental sciences, which you might find useful, and will either join or start some sort of live off the land club when I get there. What''ve you decided to do so far?
John Edward Mercier
#16 Posted : Sunday, January 07, 2007 5:19:42 AM
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Well to help your studies...
we all live off the land, sometimes directly... sometimes removed.
The Naturalist
#17 Posted : Thursday, January 11, 2007 9:40:38 PM
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Lately, I have been deciding to pursue a degree in ecology rather than pharmacy. I don''t quite know yet what degree I might finish with (bachler''s, masters, or Ph.D.), or whether I''ll decide to remain in an ecology job for a while or eventually quit such a job and fully homestead without a normal income. Whatever I do, it''ll certainly be better than the desk jobs most people have![:D]
GrannySue_in_IL
#18 Posted : Friday, January 12, 2007 4:18:09 PM
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Stay in school, lots of homesteaders need a second income...

Get involved against NAIS or it won''t matter.

Terri
#19 Posted : Sunday, January 14, 2007 12:07:49 AM
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Naturalist, do you have access to a garden space? Getting some practical experience under your belt can be helpfull.

As for diet, you will need to produce some kind of grain, veggies, meat, milk, and eggs. If you have access to a garden space you CAN get practical experience with veggies and grain.

Also, no matter where you go, you WILL have taxes and such. That cannot be helped. Some people sell produce or whatever to cover this. You will also need SOME money for salt and other essentials.

Very often when people get out of school they move to where a good job is. That means if you buy now you might own land in one place but be living in another. Plan ahead. MANY people make this work, but others will sell their land because they never see it and hope to buy another. There is no correct answer, here, it is just something to think about.

Aquiring skills is a most excellent thing to do! Learn your parents from-scratch recipies. Learn to bake bread. Cook the veggies you raise. If your parents are fixing the house, help them so you can learn how it is done.

And, save up your money. Having money in the bank brings you a LOT of freedom! Having money means that if the perfect land or job is waved under your nose, you can go for it!

Good luck!
robnsn
#20 Posted : Friday, January 19, 2007 11:54:26 PM
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Pharmicist
I''d say become that Pharmicist you want to become; then, also take up Horticulture & learn how to grow things before making such a move.
For one thing, if you don''t work at least 40 quarters, you can''t qualify for Social Security; so, what will you do for an Income once you''re too old to work & have no retirement of any sort? My Father''s parents did home-steading all their adult years, but when they got too old to farm the land, they had to go & live with the children, til their deaths. Money is very tight, in the Home-stead thing, without any other Income coming in. Become the Pharmacist, take up courses, buy the home-stead ahead of time, & home-stead it because you want to; not because you have to.
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