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Homemade Dog Food. Options
Frosty
#1 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2008 4:22:15 AM
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You are on the right path, but you may want to do a bit of research on feeding raw (the BARF diet).  Grains (wheat, oats, barley, etc...) are not necessary for dogs, and are actually not good for them.  You may want to think about either feeding ground up egg shell, or feeding bones.  If you do feed bones, they need to be RAW, not COOKED.  That is important, because the cooked bones are the ones that splinter and cause damage.  But our furry friends need calcium and fat in their diets. 

I have done a lot of reading about diets after my 15 year old cat was diagnosed as diabetic.  After changing him to a species appropriate diet, his need for insulin dropped dramatically.  It was probably the commercial food that pushed him into diabetes in the first place.  Grain allergies in dogs are fairly common, and aren't always diagnosed properly.  I asked the vet why my dog had a bald stomach, the vet said that it was 'probably like male pattern baldness'.  I am ashamed to say that I stumbled on the real reason by mistake, the poor guy had  a wheat allergy.  There were a few other things that he had been to the vet for (including seizures) that they had no answer for.  Take the grain out of his diet, and he is fine.  He is 12 years old now, pretty old for the breed, I treat his hip dysplasia with glucosamine.    

Anyhow, I would really like to encourage you to do a bit of research to make sure that you are providing Neena with all that she needs.   

Frosty
#2 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2008 4:35:01 AM
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I forgot to add... I hope that the liver is from organically raised animals, the liver is the oil filter of the body.  Any chemicals, hormones, antibiotics, etc... will be in the liver.  People shouldn't eat non-organic liver, either.   
Durgan
#3 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2008 12:00:22 PM
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Basically we have the same view.

Calcium comes from the sardines, and milk. The only grain food is oats, and very little. The liver is in small quantity also. I feel dogs require some organ meat and liver is always available. The goat meat has a small bone which is gnawed but never fully eaten. Dogs are carnivores, and I utilize what is available in my area. I  do not use commercial pet food. Commercial treats are never fed. Fat is present from the sardines, and there is some fat on the raw goat meat, sometimes lamb meat is substituted if available. To much fat makes her feces runny.

Neena poops once per day and the feces is probably of a good texture, not runny and not hard.

 In my view it is difficult to improve on what she is fed, given the existences of what is available.
Frosty
#4 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2008 1:00:17 PM
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Very true... too many people think that their pets need grain and fiber.  Animal diets cannot be confused with what people eat, which is even more true for cats than dogs - cats are obligate carnivores.  I get quite a few chicken and turkey livers, but I raise my own birds so it's basically readily available for me.  I also just ordered a really nice meat grinder that can handle poultry bones, so soon I can swap over to a true BARF diet for my indoor cats. 

Egg yolks do have a little fat in them, so that helps, too.  Just curious, why don't you feed her the egg whites too (cooked of course)?  I also let egg shells dry and run them through the blender to put out in the garden.  I forgot about the calcium in the sardines... keep forgetting that it has bones in it. 

Durgan
#5 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2008 1:45:42 PM
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I tend towards the Enzymes both for me and my dog..

The Importance of the Enzyme Factor
Digestive enzymes are substances that nature put into the bodies of our pets (and our own bodies) to unlock the nutrition contained in food. Almost every process that goes on in the body requires enzymes. Enzymes are also found in plants and raw foods, in their natural state, to aid the body produced enzymes in doing their jobs.

 

This is especially important for our pets because they rarely eat anything in its natural state. Processed pet food contains no digestive enzymes because the enzymes are destroyed by the cooking and heating required in the manufacturing process. Since cooking kills the enzymes, there is nothing in your pets’ food to help liberate the food’s nutritional value.


Hence raw food as much as possible.


sjp
#6 Posted : Tuesday, March 09, 2010 1:32:44 PM
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Homemade dog food.    For 12 years we have made our own dog food from scratch and have had up to 45 dogs to feed.    The cost of this great feed was around $10.00 per 100 lbs for years and years.   Of course now everything has gone up so it's around $15.00 per 100 lbs for 26 percent protein and around 18 percent fat.   Have a pack of foxhounds that we hunt from horseback (no - we don't kill!), and a pack of terriers - many rescues as farm dogs also.   If you look at the ingredients in most bags of dog food - all you need to do is get all the ingredients together yourself from a rendering company for the meat and bone meal, fine ground corn, soybean hull pellets, ground alfalfa, corn gluten pellets, Diamond Yeast, ADE, calcium and di cal.      We feed fresh organ meat all winter given by local butchers and have free grease all year round from a barbeque house.     So if you are feeding lots of dogs - it can be done for half the price.   sjp

Frosty
#7 Posted : Wednesday, March 10, 2010 1:09:35 PM
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Just curious, sjp... if you go to the trouble of making dog food, why put in the fillers like corn?  Carnivores have a shorter digestive tract than herbivores and really don't need (and don't really process) grains such as corn, wheat, etc...  Grains are also high on the list of allergens in pet foods.  

I have a barn cat with a rice allergy, and a dog with a wheat allergy. If I were to try to make my own pet food, I would try to feed a natural grain free diet, not try to copy the 'balanced' feeds on the market. 

I really don't mean to sound inflammatory, and apologize if it sounds that way... I am just trying to get an idea of why you add it.       

sjp
#8 Posted : Wednesday, March 10, 2010 3:48:13 PM
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No problem.   Remember that we feed meat exculsively all winter.  

The rest of the year - I have found that when the hounds are not hunting that it is important to have the hounds feel full and corn is an inexpensive filler with good carbohydrates.     Corn is only about 10% of my mix and in most commercial feeds - it can be more than 50% of the total ingredients.    I also add a little ground alfalfa as it seems that the hounds come out and "graze" if it is not in their feed.  

One ingredient that is essential and not found readily in most prepared dog food is Diamond Yeast which is great for digestion and B vitamins.   I forgot to say that I add a handful of ground beet pulp in their daily too.    Feeding so many mouths - keeping costs down and quality up is the challenge.  sjp

sjp
#9 Posted : Wednesday, March 10, 2010 3:49:20 PM
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No problem.   Remember that we feed meat exculsively all winter.  

The rest of the year - I have found that when the hounds are not hunting that it is important to have the hounds feel full and corn is an inexpensive filler with good carbohydrates.     Corn is only about 10% of my mix and in most commercial feeds - it can be more than 50% of the total ingredients.    I also add a little ground alfalfa as it seems that the hounds come out and "graze" if it is not in their feed.  

One ingredient that is essential and not found readily in most prepared dog food is Diamond Yeast which is great for digestion and B vitamins.   I forgot to say that I add a handful of ground beet pulp in their daily too.    Feeding so many mouths - keeping costs down and quality up is the challenge.  sjp

Frosty
#10 Posted : Wednesday, March 10, 2010 5:49:46 PM
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Ah... with their being 2 sources of corn listed, it sounded like there was a lot more.  I do know that it is a source of carbs, I saw first hand how taking dry food away from a diabetic cat took his insulin needs from 5U 2x/day (total of 10 U per day) down to about .5U (1/2 U) every other day.  I am not a huge fan of the fillers in the feed, but the small amount is definately better than the stuff ion the store. 

sjp
#11 Posted : Thursday, March 11, 2010 7:53:38 PM
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Corn Gluten is in most dog foods and is about 18 percent protein.     Regular fine ground corn is around 9 or 10 percent protein.    Soybean hulls are also 18 to 19 percent protein and will be classified as "grain and grain by products" on most bags of dog food.   The beet pulp and yeast are key to proper digestion - microbs and bacteria in the gut.  

If one is feeding just a couple of dogs - then other recipes are good.    But if you are feeding many large dogs - then you do the best you can with the resources available.     All dogs here are vibrantly happy and healthy - bottom line.    sjp

Durgan
#12 Posted : Thursday, March 11, 2010 7:53:38 PM
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Homemade Dog Food

http://www.durgan.org/ShortURL/?KWIOI 17 November 2008 Homemade Dog Food

This is what I feed my small, 12 pound, female, four year old, Pomeranian daily. About 6 a.m. Neena is fed a small amount of cooked oats with some milk, then given a bit of brown sugar on the kitchen tile floor as a treat.

At about 7 a.m. she is taken for a walk of five km, then she is fed the remainder of her daily ration. Her toenails are in perfect condition and are never clipped due to wear in walking.

A bowl of juice, frozen liver, one sardine, one egg yolk is supplied, and she gobbles this up without looking up.

After this she is given a small piece of frozen goat stewing meat with bone outside and she gnaws on this for about 10 minutes, which keeps her teeth white and strong. She never swallows the bone.

She is never given anything commercial which is produced for dogs like "treats".

Periodically, when I eat, she is given a small bit of my food, just for a taste, and I mean small.

Neena keeps her weight of 12 pounds, and is bright, active, and obviously very healthy.

The food selected is readily available in my area, and from my knowledge, she is getting a balanced diet.
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