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Place to stay... help with work... Tok, Alaska Options
Tenngarden
#1 Posted : Saturday, July 16, 2005 5:49:11 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Such a deal for someone wanting the Alaska thing. Wish I could go, lol. Hope you find someone to help you out.
turtlehead
#2 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2005 2:06:18 PM
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I know! Won''t that be a fantastic opportunity for someone? To experience Alaska *and* benefit from working with this very capable and knowledgable woman - what a deal! Nantinki, please tell us about your activities from time to time. I''m sure we could all learn something from you, and many of us like living vicariously through the homesteading experiences of others :)
nantinkir
#3 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2005 9:26:38 PM
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Things I intend to do around the log cabin once I really get started. Use bucket brackets such as the kind found in an equine supply or pet store. Attached to the wall or walls behind a wood stove such as mine they are an excellent way to heat a small water supply while not using the top of the stove. The brackets hold a 5 gallon galvanized or stainless steel flat back bucket. Having these between the stove and stovepipe gives a gift of warm to very hot water. It is also a very nice way to humidify.
I intend to have a large cistern box made of pig iron, used, and on an elevated frame placed above the wood stove. Attached to it I will have a cooper tubing coiled many times around the stovepipe. At the bottom I have a spigot to drain water from this tank. The heat from the stovepipe and the tank being above the stove heat the water quickly. The first water to leave the tank is usually boiling. This water heats backwards and makes the water really hot!
My ex-husband made our wringer washer turn using an ornamental windmill. Think I might try that too. On days that weren’t windy we pedaled a bike that would turn the motor.
Building a cold cupboard. Nice if your nights go down to 45 ish on average. Not any good in the south.
I do have electricity but won’t use much of it if I can help it. Just so I don’t need a hot water tank I did purchase a water heating tub, to have in the bathroom. They are in equine stores and on the net too. Mine cost 59 dollars and will cost lots less in the long run than a water heater. Summers when the wood stove wouldn’t be practical I will use it.
Maybe when I feel really ambitious I will explain a cold cupboard. They are the biggest energy saver of them all. Many places used springhouses. They are nice too but the cold cupboard is great. My grandparents had one. Never lost a bit of food either.
Nantinki
nantinkir
#4 Posted : Tuesday, July 19, 2005 12:45:50 PM
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Posts: 134,494

Things I intend to do around the log cabin once I really get started. Use bucket brackets such as the kind found in an equine supply or pet store. Attached to the wall or walls behind a wood stove such as mine they are an excellent way to heat a small water supply while not using the top of the stove. The brackets hold a 5 gallon galvanized or stainless steel flat back bucket. Having these between the stove and stovepipe gives a gift of warm to very hot water. It is also a very nice way to humidify.
I intend to have a large cistern box made of pig iron, used, and on an elevated frame placed above the wood stove. Attached to it I will have a cooper tubing coiled many times around the stovepipe. At the bottom I have a spigot to drain water from this tank. The heat from the stovepipe and the tank being above the stove heat the water quickly. The first water to leave the tank is usually boiling. This water heats backwards and makes the water really hot!
My ex-husband made our wringer washer turn using an ornamental windmill. Think I might try that too. On days that weren’t windy we pedaled a bike that would turn the motor.
Building a cold cupboard. Nice if your nights go down to 45 ish on average. Not any good in the south.
I do have electricity but won’t use much of it if I can help it. Just so I don’t need a hot water tank I did purchase a water heating tub, to have in the bathroom. They are in equine stores and on the net too. Mine cost 59 dollars and will cost lots less in the long run than a water heater. Summers when the wood stove wouldn’t be practical I will use it.
Maybe when I feel really ambitious I will explain a cold cupboard. They are the biggest energy saver of them all. Many places used springhouses. They are nice too but the cold cupboard is great. My grandparents had one. Never lost a bit of food either.
Nantinki

nantinkir
#5 Posted : Tuesday, July 19, 2005 1:39:58 PM
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Posts: 134,494
A cold cupboard can be made from almost anything but if you have stones I suggest you use them as they make the very best cupboard you will make.
These are attached directly to your home so if this isn’t possible I’m not sure that they will be of any use to you. It is a thought though.
Ours was made directly off the kitchen.
If you have a window or a door that you can spare then all the better.
The best size to begin with might be that equal to a large orange crate. This will fit around you window area and can always be undone if you find it unsuccessful. Many of our neighbors had window size but we were a very large family and it never would have done for us.
Building a cold cupboard.
Ours was the size of a small bedroom closet. It was large enough to be the size of a frig but taller. Make an opening of a door with sliding doors on the inside. The width of each door should be about 20” and the height should be tall enough to make the outside window slide easy to reach. On the outside of this closet nearest the very top you should have a slit window of nine or ten inches tall and eighteen inches wide. It should have chicken screen on the very outside to keep coons etc. out. Next it needs regular mosquito screen and the next layer needs wood or glass. The wood should slide back and forth so that it can be opened at night to let the cold evening air inside. This cools everything down and helps to get everything staying fresh.
On the inside you need to make you door with wood that will be able to slide back and forth. On the inside of this you will need a screen door also. Mostly to insure that no mice or other critters will be visiting your food. On the very coldest nights of winter we put a glass of water on the top shelf of our cupboard. As soon as we saw the slightest bit of ice form we closed the outside slide for the winter. Now it’s time to open the other slid from the inside. Just a few nights and you soon learn how much to open this at night and sometimes in the day to let in enough heat to keep things from freezing. Sometimes it takes more than an inch or two of opening. It depends on you winter climate. Stones stay colder than wood, that’s why ours was built with them.
Some of the neighbors backed up old refrigerators to openings and did it that way, some used two layers of wood with sand in between, some cinder block. Some used asbestos back then. (wonder what they would think of it now?)
We also had a spring house, (fun to play in in the summer) but not as nice in the winter. It would freeze over completely. Our cold cupboard was always cold.
(Don’t build it on the same wall as your kitchen wood stove.)

The other things we did to help keep things cold in the summer:
My grandfather cut ice in the winter and buried it deeply in sawdust. In the summer he dug from the side to get the blocks, not the top because the dust it’s self froze and he wanted to keep that seal.
We found a small block of ice two years after he died. This will tell you how useful the sawdust is.
Our sawdust crib was about twelve feet long and four feet high. At the end of every summer we loaded the dust around the house to bank it up for the winter. We also used some to cover some of the plants for the winter. It really had to be old dust and well near rotted because he knew that sawdust has arsenic in it and old sawdust has all the arsenic leached out. He didn’t want us eating food from the garden that was contaminated and he didn’t want it to get into the well.
I will try to answer questions if anyone is interested in this cupboard. Hopefully I didn’t confuse to much.
Nantinki
nantinkir
#6 Posted : Tuesday, July 26, 2005 9:21:41 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Hi All,
I have had several inquires but to date still no takers. Come for a week or two, come for the whole summer, come for whatever suits you.
Nantinki
nantinkir
#7 Posted : Friday, August 05, 2005 5:45:21 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Sugar and I are leaving this dreadful place and job to head out in 12 days.!!! I can hardly contain myself. Being a motel manager isn''t all it is made out to be. We will drive from here to the Florida panhandle and then across route 10 to El Paso Texas. From there we go north through Albuquerque, Denver, Billings, into Canada and on up to Tok, Alaska. I think we are going to freeze to death. Tok is the coldest inhabited city in The USA. It has been record hot here in southern Florida. I''m ready for the good life and Sugar is too. She''s singing we''re going to Alaska.!! lol. Wish me luck. This is a huge adventure. I haven''t even seen my log cabin yet.
nantinkir
#8 Posted : Tuesday, August 09, 2005 6:38:38 PM
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Posts: 134,494
I have gotten very many wonderful replies. There will be plenty of time between visits and if there isn''t then we will simply make do. Pitch a tent or throw down a sleeping bag. I have met lots of strangers who were friends. I''m going to have lots of work to do also. Just a little bit at a time. Thanks for the response.
Nantinki
nantinkir
#9 Posted : Sunday, August 14, 2005 4:06:06 PM
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Posts: 134,494

Today is the fourteenth and with only three to go we are having a really hard time being patient.
The responses to our posting have been so posative and wonderful it is hard to believe it. There are so many good people out there that give so much and take so little. My life is feeling very full.
I am posting an excerpt from some of the emails I received from a person or two. I was blown away by. This was because I had mentioned I would like some dogs or pets.


:"I do have perfect dogs for you, especially if they will be loved, given attention and get to run. You can turn all of my dogs loose and they will stay with you. I take them for walks all the time.
I do think that sled dogs will nip at such a young child. In fact I wouldn''t let her near them unless you knew for sure that they wouldn''t hurt her. I feel like I can tell which ones would and wouldn''t, but one can never be 100% accurate.
Would you want them permanently? I would be willing to do that, give them to you for no charge either for the year or permanently. I am having a baby in December and am trying to be realistic about what I will be able to do in the next 3 years. I don''t want my dogs to just sit here. It would be hard to let them go, but I would feel really good about them going to good places
And another one….

I will work with the
rabbit railroad (do a "Yahoo!" search for "Rabbit
Railroad" or "Rabbit Transportation", a Yahoo! Group
will show up in the results. All arrangements for
transport would be the responsibility of the buyer.
You might be able to hook up with people at the Rabbit
Railroad who can help transport for little or no cost

And another

We are both VERY interested in all of the things you described in your post. xxxx is a mechanical engineer by training, and can take apart and put back together almost anything w/ a motor or engine. He also has talked many times about eventually rigging up systems in our home that would heat water w/ our woodstove, etc. He also enjoys stone-work, carpentry and many other "handy" things like that.

I am not as skilled as he is, but I am willing to help with just about anything. I would also be so thankful for any learning opportunities (it is very frustrating trying to educate one''s self entirely by trial and error

This is just a little bit of what was sent.

I am very grateful, more than words can express.
Nantinki
gilbert
#10 Posted : Sunday, August 14, 2005 11:32:52 PM
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I will love to go, I am nearly to the point of unemployed, but how do I go there from Miami, FL?
skruzich
#11 Posted : Monday, August 15, 2005 1:37:51 AM
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I think theres a song, North to Alaska!

nantinkir
#12 Posted : Tuesday, August 16, 2005 1:58:56 PM
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Posts: 134,494
" and the rush is on.. la la la. I love it. Sugar sings it all day long.
We are so excited and scared at the same time. Especially about receiving the dog team. I just can''t wait.
My life was blessed when I was a child. I was allowed to live with my grandparents growing up. They were very old when I joined them. Both were born in the eighteen hundreds.
They saw so many new things happen. The birth of cars, electricity, etc. But basically they were not as fortunate as most people so they lived without many of the more modern conveniences.
I was taught so many of the old ways. I even was taught how to English shuttle tat. This is an art, which is lost today. I never met another that knows how to do it.
We grew up eating chickens, rabbits, wild game, and all fresh food. We made our own everything. Salt pork, horseradish, all the crockery food, canned and smoked, and jerked meat. I did not have much other than fresh or homemade food in my growing years.
When they passed away they took many of their old home medicine and remedies with them but I do remember a few. If I were not so lazy I would try to write down what I do remember some day.
Things we ate kept mosquitoes off us in the summer but I can''t remember what that was. I keep trying to think of it but can''t. I will need that more now than ever. lol
When I get to Alaska I am going to try to keep a journal of what it is that we are doing and how it was done. Hopefully I will do it right.
I am going to have so little money that in the beginning I will probably not even have the electricity turned on. That is if I can help it anyway.
I will be out of touch soon and will not be making to many notes but at my daughters house I will do the first few then when we get to WM I will do more then finally the last before we hit Canada I am stopping at the home of people that are going to come to Alaska to stay with me for a month to help out and to explore the Last Frontier.
Hopefully we will be able to do things that are good for the soul, spirit, body, and the earth. No more washing machine, no dishwasher, no disposable razor, no more microwave, no more no more no more.
Now guns, dogs, candles, wood, tallow, treadle, knitting needles, etc. soon no computer, just trips to the library…
Wish us luck…………………………………………………….
More later,
Nantinki and the Sugar Bear
nantinkir
#13 Posted : Sunday, August 21, 2005 5:43:06 PM
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Well,
we are in El Paso, TX. This wouldn''t mean to much if the weather wasn''t so bad. Over 100 degrees all the way and we don''t have any air conditioning. The motel we stayed in last night was so cheap, I should have checked it out before paying. No A/C. No sleep last night so we are relaxing because tomorrow we both go to the dentist in Juarez.
Turtlehead, you were given such a kind warning. God is good.
Next is Albuquerque.
Nantinki
turtlehead
#14 Posted : Monday, August 22, 2005 2:52:19 PM
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El Paso!? The journey is on! And then Albuquerque (thank goodness you spelled it in your post so all I had to do was copy it). I''m tickled you had a chance to post a little update to us. My thoughts are with you and Sugar. Safe Journey.
nantinkir
#15 Posted : Monday, August 22, 2005 3:06:03 PM
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Thanks so much for that Turtle. We are happy. I have been released from house arrest! lol. That''s what being a motel manager makes one feel like. Sugar sang "we goin to Nalaska" all the way here.!!! That and other news, we are still on the consideration list for the series. Dunno if that will happen though. If it does I want all my buddies from the MENF to make a visit when they are filming. It would be so much fun for us all.
I have been gifted a gun for hunting my own meat. Hope I don''t shoot myself in the foot! Never before have I killed. I wonder about this. There must be some way to not have the hurt feelings? I feel that I will be sentencing something to a death sentence so that I no longer have to eat plastic covered meat. Any feelings on this. I really do have to furnish my own food. Gardening has always been a major love of mine but that I have never done in such a cold climate either. I will need major prayers as well as all the faith of others. I really do want to do this in a good way.
Nantinki and the Sugar Bear
emulkahi1
#16 Posted : Monday, August 22, 2005 8:48:00 PM
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Nantinki--

Your journey is on! How very exciting[:D]! Keep us posted on your progress...I want to make sure we are not out-of-town when you cruise through!!

As for the hunting quandry. Jim and I have existed off of deer, antelope, rabbit and the meat of 1 wild turkey for a couple of years now. It is traumatic, as it is hard to think of what the animal is giving up so that we might live. I wish that Mother Nature had designed a gentler system. But she didn''t, and if one chooses each animal carefully, one can help contribute to the overall health of the herd.

It is good, in our opinions, to see first-hand the real cost of one''s meat. Being removed from its source, as we are by the sterile environment of most supermarkets, makes it too easy to forget how we are still part of Mother Nature''s grand design (predator/prey). Knowing the animals that become your nourishment helps us remember to be grateful for their sacrifice. In a way, their lives continue as they provide fuel for our bodies. Hence, the circle of life[:)]...

Anyway, that is how we think of it here. I am sure each individual must deal with it in his or her own way though.

We are wishing you safe (and cooler!) travels!

Erin
nantinkir
#17 Posted : Sunday, August 28, 2005 5:31:14 PM
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Thanks for that Erin. We are in Albuquerque having a wonderful time. The prices here are amazing and I have purchased a few necessary things. We still need so much more but we are on a very tight budget. I was hoping to get some used tools, saw, hammers, hand tools that come in handy, shovels, etc. but no luck on that.
I already have a few kerosene lanterns and lots of candles, strikers, but no water buckets, (not the kind that I want) and other items that will be used instead of electricity. I will need battery-operated drills, other things like that, and some utilities that are battery operated.
One thing is for sure: we have lots of blankets, quilts, and the necessary bedding so we don’t freeze if the stoves go out. Hopefully that will never happen.
I am not sure about food yet. Although it will be pretty late when we get there I still want to can and freeze what I can. There won’t be a problem with meat and fish. There is always something to hunt or fish for.
It is getting pretty close to us being in the cabin and I am starting to get anxious and excited.
Hopefully I won’t have trouble at the border with all the stuff.
Soon we will be in Denver then on to Cody then back to Billings and on up 87 in Canada to Tok.
Thanks you all for all the wonderful letters and encouragements. We are blessed to have it! Thanks for the goodwill and prayers too.
Nantinki and the Sugar Bear still on the road to Tok
Valduare
#18 Posted : Monday, August 29, 2005 9:43:56 AM
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Posts: 134,494
is the offer still available by chance?
nantinkir
#19 Posted : Tuesday, August 30, 2005 6:09:59 PM
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Big question here???? Does anyone know how to render and purify tallow? I will be making as much as is possible while I am here because tallow and lard are fed to the dogs in Alaska. That will make it impossible for me to get enough to make my candles. That will be new for me too!
Today we are going to all the stores around here to ask for as much beef fat as we can get. Now we need to know how to clean it.
as always, many thanks,
Nantinki still in Albuquerque.
emulkahi1
#20 Posted : Thursday, September 01, 2005 4:48:28 AM
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Nantinkir--

Try posting your tallow question in its own topic...That way, maybe, more people that are learned on the subject might see it? Just a thought...Wouldn''t want you to end up w/ a carload of spoiled beef fat :-0!!

Safe travels to you!!!!!!

Erin
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