Logged in as: Anonymous Search | Active Topics |

Indoor wood burner vs. wood stove Options
davisonh
#1 Posted : Friday, January 18, 2008 1:25:18 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Okay,lots of questions and I think I can help out a bit.I  own an outdoor wood boiler and heat a 1200 sq ft home with it quite effectively.Theres one huge difference and is the main reason why you will use less wood with an indoor wood furnace than you will with a woodstove and its kind of difficult to explain so here goes:The difference between a 'wood furnace' and a 'wood stove' is that the furnace actually automatically controls the fire whereas a woodstove does not.A wood furnace usually has some means to shut the fire 'off' or 'down' when the thermostat controlling its operation is satisfied.The fire uses little or no fuel in 'off' mode but is very very hot.There is no air for combustion to take place and so the fire 'sits' until its called for again.The solenoid activates,air blows across the seemingly dead coals and within a few minutes the fire is roaring again.Now as for channeling the heat.That depends on if you buy a boiler or a furnace.If you buy a small boiler the heat s transferred thru a 'reheat' coil in the plenum of your air conditioning duct.You normally have a separate thermostat for the wood furnace(or,use the 'heat' section of your dual thermostat if you have one)and you wire the 'other' side of the blower relay that controls the fan of your A/C blower,to the wood furnace tstat.If you have a 'furnace' and not a boiler then you do the same except the wood furnace tstat is wired to a relay that controls the damper solenoid on the furnace.The furnace is ducted into the plenum and the return of your A/C ductwork in parallel,NOT in series.As far as a woodstove goes,well what my father did with his coal stove was he built a hood over the stove and ducted it into the ductwork that way with a small fan but there was no way to control it so every once in awhile it drove us out of there,lol.You will use far less wood with a furnace than you will a stove IMO,.,
Sandman
#2 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2008 5:20:33 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

Late post I know but maybe this helps you or someone else.  I have done exactly what you have wanted to do.  I put my wood furnace in the basement close to the NG furnace and heat my 2000 sq ft drafty (not) old farm house with it.  Things to know...

1.) Chimneys out side that are double wall tend to creosote faster than a chimney running up the center of the house.  The brick chimney inside stays warmer and helps heat and maintains high flue temps.  The outside double wall on cold bitter day struggles to maintain a good temp and if the pipe is cold when you start a fire you may even find a smoke problem in the house as you start you fire because heat is finding the path of least resistance.  On these days I pre heat my stove pipe for 5 min with a space heater in my stove before I start a fire and all is well.  I actually only do this a couple times a winter, most of the time the fire is kept hot.  Where it gets me is we have a 65*F day and the next day its -30 and I need to start a fire.

2.)  Your local heating and cooling place will make your pleneum and or duckwork and you can hang it or have them do it for you.  My store sits 5 foot from my NG furnace and I put a large pleneum on top and pop rivit the two together with a 12 x 16 in hole on one side to the furnace.  Add this to the furnace and you have central heating by wood.  If you don't have the room to add another duct to the furnace pleneum I pulled off one room and duct into that hole and then ducked the room off to the duck coming from the wood furnace as well.  All said and done my heating dropped from 400.00 in January to 8.00 in feb to run the two electric fans on the wood furnace.  I have NG as back up but by december I just blow the piolet light out and save even more.  If you get to the poing of doing that I went and pulled the filter and cut a plywood board same size but 2 inches longer so I could pull it out easier if I ever need the NG pig again. 

3.)  I did insulate the plenteum and ductwork with unsulation and all seams with that aluminum tape.  I went further and bought some replacement BQ thermometers and installed them in different places to see the temp gains and losses.  Another thing I did was upstairs I put the lead wire to one of those outside temp things down in the heater vent in the room we sit most in.  They max out at around 155*F and work real well.  If I see it that high I go down and check the draft or if someone left the ash door open.  The NG furnace when on ran about 122*F and my wood furnace runs 115-155*F out the central heating vents.  Cold days its high and warm days lower... but in the end if you watch your temp gauge and the temp goes down 135, 130, 122 I go down and add more wood.  Save trips up and down!!

4.) Being a old farm house I still have the old coal shoot and thats where my wood drops to.  I get about a 9-12 hr burn bepending on the cold and the wood but checking the stove 2-3 times a day and saving 400.00 dollars a month is well worth it.  Hope this wasn't too late and helped.

Anonymous
#3 Posted : Wednesday, September 17, 2008 6:16:11 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

i know woodburner is very effective to wood stove.wood stove is using simply and smartly.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

harris

[url=http://www.fastrealestate.net]FSBO[/url]

harris12
#4 Posted : Wednesday, September 17, 2008 6:23:01 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

i know woodburner is very effective to wood stove.wood stove is using simply and smartly.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

harris

[url=http://www.fastrealestate.net]FSBO[/url]

Yukon
#5 Posted : Monday, August 03, 2009 7:44:02 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

If your looking to heat the whole home on half of the wood a stove uses and to get an all night burn time...look to Yukon furnaces.

jmpnjmy
#6 Posted : Monday, August 03, 2009 7:44:02 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I've been back and forth between the two.  I have ruled out outdoor due to my personal preferences. 

Looking to heat 2200 sf.  I like the furnace idea as I believe they can be controlled a bit better (I believe I've seen thermostatic controls on some) but I know I could get used to firing a stove appropriately.  I like the idea of less loading with the furnace but know I'll have to deal with indoor mess somewhat.

Currently I have radiant ceiling heating in my upstairs level only.  All electric home.  No furnace, just central AC.  My question about utilizing a wood stove vs. furnace is.....how would I channel the heat from a wood stove into the duct work so that I could use the AC blower to circulate heat?  Is this feasible?  And what size of stove would I need to adequately heat this sq. ft?  Either unit I choose would be in the basement and there's no option for a stove upstairs. 

I'm really leaning to the furnace because I'm wanting to tap into the heating duct work and they come ready to do so and with a fan.  Am I missing something about utilizing a stove to heat two levels?  I don't have a layout where the radiant heat would just rise naturally to the upper level through stairwell etc.  It has to be tied to the ductwork.  And there are bedrooms in the basement, so I don't want to get it so hot down there (in order for any radiant heat to rise) that it sweats out the occupants.

Any help?  Thoughts?

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Users browsing this topic
Anonymous
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.





Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.