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grandmadiane
#1 Posted : Thursday, March 26, 2009 6:10:15 AM
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Posts: 134,494

Sounds good to me! Hopefully others will join in as they see this. Name the subject or ingredient and I'll start going through my recipes. Let me know when you want to start.

Diane

sherryv
#2 Posted : Wednesday, May 27, 2009 2:40:33 AM
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Posts: 134,494

I'm looking for bread with NO wheat flour. I'd like to join in your recipe discussion too!

sherryv4

grandmadiane
#3 Posted : Monday, June 01, 2009 12:10:53 AM
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Posts: 134,494

Does it need to be gluten free? Or are you just staying away from wheat? I know of some folks who use gluten free recipes. I could ask them if they have any good bread recipes.

Diane

Sarah/Librum
#4 Posted : Tuesday, June 02, 2009 12:53:24 PM
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Posts: 134,494

You are asking me for recipes?  Huh?

I am still crawling through the ICS Womens Institute of Cookery book set we restored.  I doubt you would be interested in such older works.  After all, you have all those new fangled tools, ingredients (gluten free?), etc. Seriously, I am stuck in the early 1900s.

Sarah

Frosty
#5 Posted : Friday, June 12, 2009 9:40:55 AM
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Posts: 134,494

Sarah, those old recipes are the best ones!  Back when food was filling and good instead of fancy and 'healthy' (funny on how their definition of healthy food keeps changing!)  

Sarah/Librum
#6 Posted : Sunday, June 14, 2009 2:11:28 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

 

 

OK, then, I will kick it off.  I was asked if I knew a way to reuse damaged jars.  At first I did not want to answer, as we do not 'jar' that much, we are heavy on the 'canning' (real cans).  But, yes, damaged jars can be used when doing a 'cloth pickle', also known as a 'molasses' pickle.  I have tried it, it works, and the molasses is reuseable.  This type of pickling is a lost art, even among us.  Note that the item being pickled must be a true berry.  Strawberries and the like will not work.  A 'hard' skin is required.  Basically, the fruit 'turns' inside its skin with the molasses sealing the skin.  I have a batch of culled whole baby apples I have tried also, but the batch is too new to tell if it is effective.

(start paste)

BLUE-BERRY PICKLES.

For blue-berry pickles, old jars which have lost their covers, or whose edges have been broken so that the covers will not fit tightly, serve an excellent purpose, as these pickles must not be kept air-tight.

Pick over your berries, using only sound ones; fill four jars or wide-mouthed bottles to within an inch of the top, then pour in molasses enough to settle down into all the spaces; this cannot be done in a moment, as molasses does not run very freely. Only lazy people will feel obliged to stand by and watch its progress. As it settles, pour in more until the berries are covered. Then tie over the top a piece of cotton cloth to keep the flies and other insects out, and set away in the preserve closet. Cheap molasses is good enough, and your pickles will soon be "sharp." Wild grapes may be pickled in the same manner.

(end paste)

 

The forum software is messing up again.  Dratted underlines for no reason.

Sarah

 

Farside
#7 Posted : Saturday, June 20, 2009 11:01:25 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

Interesting Sarah.  I might give this one a try.

 

A Question (or two, or three)...How long before the berries become "sharp"?  And, what is "sharp"?  How is the dish served?

 

Sarah/Librum
#8 Posted : Saturday, June 20, 2009 7:12:00 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

Sharp as it slightly fermits inside the skins.  Amos grabs a spoon, scoops some out, and smears it on bread, making sure he crushes the berries.  When I catch him at it I raz him a little.  I put the berries I want in a strainer over the mouth of the jar, so the molasses can drain some.  The open jar sits in the refrigerator.

Sarah

Farside
#9 Posted : Saturday, June 20, 2009 7:12:00 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

Someone else mentioned (in another thread) how they can't find the other recipe thread we had.  Maybe its time to give it another go.  What ya'll think?  And Sarah, I would like to invite you to share a few recipes with us.

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