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Cutting Trees Options
JAK
#1 Posted : Friday, June 08, 2007 11:54:44 PM
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Hmmm. What kind of trees are they? Maybe there is a way to make them work for you rather than having to wipe all of them out wholesale. Can they be coppiced, for firewood, or building and craft materials?  Are there any fruit or nut trees, or maple or birch syrup? If you are interested in stuff like mushrooms perhaps mushrooms or other such things like truffles might work within a forest system. What about wildlife habitat? Do the trees attract any useful critters? The other thing to look at is grazing. Some animals graze very well in forest systems. I would suggest you consider concentrating your crops in more intensive growing systems. The forest can provide materials for building raised beds and for providing rich soil building materials, especially if you have some grazing animals. Consider the traditional French Intensive system, combined with traditional English Coppice systems. You can do this gradually. Eventually you might have more raised beds than forests, but initially at least some the forest might be more productive left as they are or gradually thinned out rather than doing too much at once. The other thing to consider besides intensive raised beds is something like three sisters, which allows you an easy way to plant large vegetables like corn, squash, and beans without having to purchase heavy equipment for pulling stumps and ploughing. Potatoes might also work well. I guess the tricky thing is what to do with the partial shade, in the space between the raised beds and the trees. Some vegetables grow well in partial shade. A better use might be stuff like chickens and out buildings, if not too tall. Your house of course, if not too tall. On 2.5 acres in a city you probably want to maximize land use, so every nook and cranny should be thought out I suppose. Hills can be used, or created to maximize use of sun where its available. Roofs might be used for the raised beds also, or at least for catching rainwater. A pond for fish might be an excellent use for those shady places, since fish grow faster in cold water. Anyhow, just a bunch of ideas. The main thing is there might be some economy in mixing trees with other systems, or at least weeding the trees out gradually rather than all at once. Best wishes.

John Edward Mercier
#2 Posted : Saturday, June 09, 2007 5:20:29 PM
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It would depend on the level of 'farming' that your proposing.

I live on 2.1 acres and have no problems intergrating the roughly 75% of my property covered with trees.

 

bmason
#3 Posted : Monday, June 11, 2007 2:55:42 AM
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99% of the trees i want to cut are pine trees...they shade out the majority of the land of that would be suitable to plant, and they make a mess of the soil....i spend way too much time cleaning pine needles, cones and limbs from my yard.  Not to mention they are extremely tall and very close to the house, widow makers if you please.  I'm getting someone to come out next week and give me an appraisal for the cutting, and I will be going from there.

btw, thanks for the comments...

John Edward Mercier
#4 Posted : Monday, June 11, 2007 3:27:15 AM
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I wouldn't feel too bad about cutting the pines...

They're generally too tall for a good windbreak...

I only have a few...

But I leave them alone, because I have hawks nesting in them. A tall pole with a nesting spot on top would do the same thing... but that would take effort without a good reason.

 

 

John Stiles
#5 Posted : Tuesday, June 12, 2007 6:47:35 PM
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Having them cut will be expensive, hundreds of dollars or much more. Then the roots will preclude soil preparation. Move if you want to do extensive gardening. Trees are big dangerous weeds. I enjoy my thousands of trees but even some of my experienced tree climbing buddies won't touch them. Especially the big ones that may be trouble.

 It may be we are just getting too old to really want to go after them.

JAK
#6 Posted : Tuesday, June 12, 2007 9:15:45 PM
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I would hope that if you do have to clear that many trees you get a good price for them.

davisonh
#7 Posted : Wednesday, June 13, 2007 1:27:59 AM
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Yes,Johns' right,even I have my limits as to the size of tree I'll fell.I've done all the tree clearing

I need to do around the house,any huge ones too close to the house are gone,but as far as the huge 4 or 5 foot diameter ones I have down in my woods I leave alone unless Mother Nature does her thing...then I'll take them.

Jerry
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 13, 2007 2:44:28 AM
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Take a serious look at thining the pines based on the arc of the Sun. You may be able to cut only a small portion. And thining a pine thicket will allow the others to grow stronger and be less likely to fall.
TheLostCossack
#9 Posted : Monday, April 28, 2008 3:34:10 PM
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One option you may have considered is selling the trees. contact a local lumber yard or a local logging company. white pine is generaly the most used wood for lumber, you can often find local companies that will buy the trees from you, fell them, and remove them, leaving you with just the cleanup. if you have a nice old stand with straight trees you might be suprised to find some eager loggers. the biggest issue for them is if it will be worth their time. if you have a considerable amount of trees your chances will be much greater. just start calling around and asking friends if they know people as well.......good luck

also if their felling path is unobstructed it would be reasonable to cut them yourself and much cheaper..

just dont buy a poulan saw.

katydaly
#10 Posted : Friday, February 27, 2009 8:30:44 PM
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katydaly
#11 Posted : Friday, February 27, 2009 8:41:55 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Kris Bethea
#12 Posted : Friday, February 27, 2009 9:54:41 PM
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katydaly wrote:

Test, please ignore
testmember
#13 Posted : Friday, February 27, 2009 9:59:16 PM
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katydaly wrote:

Test. Please ignore


davisonh
#14 Posted : Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:57:20 AM
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Katy are those trees coming down?They look like they're way too close to the house.I took the ones too close

to my  house down too..9-76 foot to 110 foot pines 2' in diameter

bmason
#15 Posted : Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:57:20 AM
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First of all, hello, I'm new to the forums and very new to the practical application of the homesteading ideas I've been reading about for several years now.   I am anxious to start certain applications, some of which I can and have started immediately(composting, vermicomposting, chickens...) but the main one, gardening is on hold.  You see, my yard is completely(well for the most part) covered by trees and i have less than 2 hours of direct sun in any given spot.   I have about 2.5 acres in the city limits, one acre is a tree covered hill that I want to grow shitake mushrooms on, and the remainder is shaded with  oaks and a heavy stand of pines.  

Should I spend thousands of dollars on getting the trees cut and the soil structure boosted or just take that money and find a new spot to live with plenty of sunlight and land(2-3 acres)?   I hate to cut all those trees, but they are keeping the farmer in me down.

bart

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