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creepy crawlys on mater plants Options
skruzich
#41 Posted : Friday, July 11, 2003 6:14:46 PM
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U brought it up first street ;)
aris
#42 Posted : Friday, July 11, 2003 7:20:41 PM
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...Heinlein said ''Turn it around, mirror image; if it looks fair from either side, then it''s a fair deal''.

Guys with heart conditions don''t do it for me, either, Steve. [xx(]

Hey, Weeknee -- about using antifreeze to kill weeds? Please do. When arable land becomes scarce, my descendants will find a way to detoxify it and make it gloriously bountiful. I''m sure you''re nice people and great neighbors, but it''s one of those ''survival of the fittest'' things; that antifreeze in your garden is just bleach in the gene pool as far as I''m concerned.
skruzich
#43 Posted : Friday, July 11, 2003 7:43:18 PM
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LOL Aris has a sense of humor too ;P. So rare these days.
stevve
aris
#44 Posted : Friday, July 11, 2003 7:46:27 PM
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Don''t get me started, Steve! My Dad''s a barber, and I know only two jokes that wouldn''t get me k-lined permanently, and not just from this forum. Okay, three, there''s the one about hummingbirds humming. And I can tell the story of my suiciding guppies, but that''s not a joke, that''s compost tea gone to waste...!
weeknee
#45 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2003 4:41:02 AM
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Dang aris,why dont ya refill the pezz dispenser with some qualudes and kick back for a bit.After bout 3 or 4 youd realize im just like the rest of the folks tryin to keep a smile on thier face while standing chin deep in this s**tcreek.Is that a motor boat i hear??....OH MAN! a water skier.I think we got way off the subject here in this thread.I asked for advive and took it for what its worth.I made an educated decision based on the info i gathered.Im satisfied with my decision and am glad this forum is in place to share ideas.God bless America,no matter what God anyone chooses to belive in. On another note,and changing gears grindingly,Ive made an interesting discovery.I planted some chinese elm bushes about 2 years ago.Those suckers grow very quickly and make a good screen for nosey neighbors.Anyway,ever since i planted the bushes, ive not had a problem with japaneese beetles in the garden.They seem to prefer the bushes to the garden.They feast on the bushes and leave the garden alone.The bushes are hardley harmed due to thier rapid growth.Like i said, just somthing i discovered.
skruzich
#46 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2003 5:30:06 AM
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Ok weeknee thats a good suggestion. I will look into it. For this year i am afraid i am stuck with what i am doing. Next year i should be able to implement some other methods and try to find a solution that works.
Oh and Aris'' reply was tounge in cheek ;) Its a wierd sense of humor too! hehe
qualudes aren''t good anymore, they changed the formula years ago ;D
How about some morning glory seeds, and some ergot fungus hehe
steve
tedlucas
#47 Posted : Monday, July 14, 2003 6:33:59 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Thanks for the info guys, I''ll check it out. Sorry about the slow reply. I was not intentionally being rude. My son downloaded a rather large and nasty worm with some video games that Norton did not see. I''m back on line now though.
skruzich
#48 Posted : Monday, July 14, 2003 7:15:05 PM
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LOL gotta love those worms ;) What kind, nightcrawler or red wiggler hehe
steve
jinxd
#49 Posted : Sunday, July 20, 2003 2:27:55 PM
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Do NOT buy those Bag A Bug traps.Alls they do is attract the beetles and then they eat eveything they can .Here in the Midwest we got hit bad last year.The beetles were so bad you thought it was sleeting when you drove down the roads, in all areas.The bags on those traps were being replaced with 30 gallon trash bags. all the neighboring townspeople had them in thier yards IT WAS HORRIBLE. and they just kept coming and OH the stink of those dead beetles in a 30 gallon trash bag GAG-O-MEGA[xx(] SO needless to say we are having a smaller wave of them this year and there is not one person in the 3 surrounding towns that will EVER buy a BAG-A-BUG again
and heck yes they eat leaves they or maybe suck the juices out as to make it appear as if the leaf has been eaten,whichever,they are devastating and nothing appears to work at killing them either [xx(]Chemical or natural..But one unconventional method to hand picking the nasty little things is THE HAND HELD DUSTBUSTER.....[:D] I CANT STAND THE BUGS AND REFUSE TO TOUCH THEM AND THIS WORKS FINE.. a real long extension cord and a real vacuum will work too. Sevin dust be danged.
skruzich
#50 Posted : Sunday, July 20, 2003 10:42:20 PM
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Jinxd, are you talking about japanese beetles! If you are, Sevin dust, in the liquid or powder will kill them or at least run them off your plants.
This year so far, i have only sprayed sevin one time on my plants and it seems that that initial spray and the showers we get every three or four days keeps them off so far. ;)
I am hoping.
Steve
williamsson
#51 Posted : Friday, July 25, 2003 10:03:35 AM
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fyi, from today''s Washington Post gardening section,

". . . We''re told that marigolds planted in the vegetable garden deter pests, especially the root-knot nematode, a microscopic worm that can be serious problem in areas with warm, sandy soils.
Does this work? Yes and no. Researchers find that marigold roots can emit enough ozone to trap and kill nematodes, but it has to be the right marigold (French marigold, Tagetes patula) and only certain species of nematode are affected. Some nematodes are actually attracted to marigolds, as are whiteflies and spider mites.
Also, marigolds don''t repel nematodes just by growing there and blooming. You must plant them thickly throughout the whole affected area, then till them under in fall to lend protection to next year''s crops. And marigolds may even be allelopathic -- that is, toxic to some vegetables, such as beans and cabbage. This is the flip side of companion planting.
So it''s not as simple as just planting a row of the "Nema-gone" marigolds that one popular seed catalogue cheerfully promotes.
What you can do is sustain the creatures that help keep pest species in balance; these helpers include birds, snakes, frogs, bats and a host of predatory insects. Your garden is not the set of an action movie in which there are good guys and bad guys, but rather a complex web of interdependent species that are used to working things out without your help.
The most important step is to refrain from using toxic substances against any of them.
The next step is to try to create a diverse habitat in which as many species as possible can thrive. You''ll need moist, mulched, shaded areas for the beetles; berries for the birds; sunny places for butterflies; and compost-rich soil for all the essential bacteria and fungi that make things grow.
It also helps to grow lots of the plants that insects love. Members of the carrot family, which includes dill, fennel, coriander, angelica and yarrow, attract not only important pollinating insects, but also predators such as lady beetles, ichneumen wasps, lacewings, hoverflies and pirate bugs that feed on inconvenient species such as aphids, mites and scale. The flowers of these plants are umbels -- little flat-topped flower fields offering up tiny nectar-filled cups from which even small insects can feed.
The daisy-shaped members of the aster family, such as Shasta daisies and brown-eyed Susans, are also good insect attractors. Include them in meadow plantings and flower gardens. So are the brassicas such as cabbage, mustard and broccoli. Leave them in the vegetable garden even after they''ve gone to seed. Have plenty of flowers blooming all the time. . . "
weeknee
#52 Posted : Friday, July 25, 2003 10:03:35 AM
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I got a huge surprise last night when i went to check on a sickly looking tomato plant.It was/is covered in tiny brown to light brown aphid looking bugs.I have out about 18 mater plants in all,but only the one is affected.It doesnt appear that the bugs are munching on the plant. Does anyone have an idea what the heck is going on??
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