How to Build Live Rodent Traps

Here's a way to catch henhouse marauders without harming a hair on their furry little bods.


| July/August 1984



088-130-01i1

Build this trap to catch and relocate live rodents.


PHOTO: GENETTE DORDAHL

You say there's a weasel dining on your chickens? A raccoon's growing fat on the eggs? Squirrels are gnawing through your roof, rabbits are eating all the lettuce from your garden, and a porcupine is sharpening its teeth on your truck's tires? And because of all that your thoughts are growing ever darker ... you have murder in your heart ... but, when it comes right down to it, you just can't bear to hurt the pesky rascals?

Well, you'd better get off dead center and do something. 

You might try running about your place at odd hours of the night, wearing a flowing white nightie and banging on a pie pan with a hammer. Or perhaps you should take up playing the flute and Pied Piper the furry rustlers over yon far hill.

Or you might want to live trap the bothersome little dears and release them miles away (say, for instance, near the home of the president of your local utility company).

But you've seen live rodent traps advertised, and you know they're expensive. You can't afford one? All right. I'll show you how to build your own for nothing (or maybe for $5, depending on the health of your scrap pile). It'll take only a few hours to whop together.

Step One: Build a Box 

The size of the box is up to you. Just make it big enough to accommodate the largest animal you intend to catch. But, as a practical matter, don't build a trap that's much bigger than you need. I like a cage 12" high by 12" wide by 18" deep. With that size, I can capture anything from a squirrel to a raccoon without fear of harming the prisoner.





dairy goat

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Aug. 5-6, 2017
Albany, Ore.

Discover a dazzling array of workshops and lectures designed to get you further down the path to independence and self-reliance.

LEARN MORE