Learn How to Weld

See how to set up a welding shop in your home and begin working with metal.



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This shows beads formed on amperage settings ranging from too low (cold) to too high (hot) should help, but here are some other things to look for: Slag pockets: black, nonmetallic deposits in the weld. Try keeping the electrode movement steady . . . and hold the rod at an angle closer to perpendicular. Undercutting: a shallow groove along one or both sides of a weld. This usually results from moving the electrode too fast. Slow down a little. Spatter: droplets of metal around the weld. It isn't a serious problem, but-if adjusting amperage doesn't cure it-you may be holding the electrode too high.
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Gather the supplies and you are ready for welding.
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A welding station. Make sure to clamp the work tightly to the bench.
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Beveled joint edges on thick steel improve the bond.
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A final grinding of the welded metal.
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A completed weld.
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Welded metal.
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Arcing metal.
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A blueprint of an arc welding schematic.
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