How to Make an Inukshuk

Learn how to make an inukshuk. Inuit people of the Arctic build a cairn of rocks erected in order create a recognizable landmark. Build your own inukshuk snow “man,” which is the 2010 Winter Olympics mascot.
By Robert McCauley
December 2007/January 2008
Add to My MSN

The 2010 Winter Olympic mascot is this snowman, an inukshuk. Vancouver artist Elena Rivera MacGregor designed this winning inukshuk logo for the Winter Games.
Illustration by Elena Rivera MacGregor


Content Tools

Related Content

A Year in the Round: From the Ground Up (Pt. 1)

Settling on a flooring option for the tipi was pretty simple after coming across an awesome company ...

Plan Next Year's Garden Now

Plan fall cover crops to feed back the soil and leave the bed ready for when you need to plant the m...

Senators and Conservations Groups Push for Protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Today, eight conservations groups and 25 senators sent letters to President Obama to protect the Arc...

Homemade Butterfinger Ice Cream

Here is an excellent recipe for homemade Butterfinger ice cream.

You can learn how to make an inukshuk. Building snowmen is a great outdoor winter activity. You can add a unique element to the project by creating this snow “man,” an inukshuk, which is the 2010 Winter Olympics mascot.

Learn How to Make an Inukshuk

An inukshuk is a cairn of rocks erected by the Inuit people of the Arctic to create a recognizable landmark. It often takes the form of a man, and has been adopted as the symbol of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada. Along with the maple leaf and the beaver, the inukshuk is becoming another symbol of Canada.

You can make the inukshuk from flat rocks or, in northern regions, out of blocks of snow. For starters, find some boxes that have the basic dimensions of one-half foot by 1 foot by 2 feet. Pack snow into the box and let it set for a few hours to solidify. You will need six blocks, all the same or nearly the same size.

After removing the blocks from their form, assemble them as in the picture, at right. To make the structure sturdier, pour some water over the legs and let them freeze before stacking the other blocks. Two horizontal blocks are necessary to make the arms.

— Kitchener, Ontario








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.