How to Crochet a Log Cabin Pullover

Make this crocheted version of a traditional patchwork pattern.
By Annette Lep
January/February 1984
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The log cabin block pattern and design for assembling the patchwork sweater.
ILLUSTRATION: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
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It seems that the most interesting craft projects combine several arts, and this pullover sweater is no exception. The multicolored yarn and the challenging layout should keep a crochet­er intrigued throughout the entire proj­ect. And like its authentic patchwork predecessors, which made use of various scraps of cloth from the ragbag, this "Log Cabin" sweater economically employs odds and ends of yarn.

This garment is a lady's medium-sized pullover, fitting sizes 8-12. The finished sweater has a bust measurement of 40" and a shoulder to bottom-edge length of 21".

Materials: This sweater pattern requires the following amounts of yarn (I've suggested some colors, but you can sub­stitute any hues as long as you apply the basic principles of moving from "sun­shine to shade"-or light to dark tones-­commonly used in the "Log Cabin" pat­tern). To follow my hue pattern exactly, you'll need eight ounces of burgundy (code letters F/FF on the color chart) . . . two ounces each of taupe (G) and white (GG) . . . one ounce each of pale apricot (E), beige (EE), dark brown (D), navy blue (DD), light gray (C), and light blue (CC) . . . half an ounce each of deep pur­ple (B) and dark green (BB) . . . and small amounts of red (A) and turquoise (AA). You'll also need a size H crochet hook (or the appropriate size to give you the fol­lowing gauge) and a large-eyed tapestry needle.

Gauge: 4 single crochet equal 1" and 4 rows of single crochet equal 1". A finished Log Cabin square should measure 9" square.

Patchwork Crochet

Start your sweater by making four Log Cabin No. 1 blocks, using colors A through G and arranging them as shown in Fig. 1. Then crochet four Log Cabin No. 2 blocks, using colors AA through GG, and arrange the colors as shown in Fig. 1. (Note: The side of the work facing you as you work Row 1 and Row 3 of each band will be the right side of the piece. When it's time to change colors, always attach the yarn from the reverse-wrong-side. The first row of Band 2 and of each succeeding band is worked by pick­ing up stitches along a side edge of the piece . . . always pick up these stitches evenly and work the last stitch of the row in the very corner of the piece. To elimi­nate the need for weaving in the yarn ends after each block is completed, work the ends in as you crochet.)

The following directions apply to each of the eight squares. To start the center of the block, ch 6, then work 5 sc across each row for 5 rows (remember that in single crochet you ch 1 st at the end of a row to turn the work). Now, with the center square done, you'll crochet 12 colored bands, each of which will consist of 5 rows of single crochet.

Band 1. Work 5 sc across each row.

Band 2 and Band 3. Work 10 sc across each row.

Band 4 and Band 5. Work 15 sc across each row.

Band 6 and Band 7. Work 20 sc across each row.

Band 8 and Band 9. Work 25 sc across each row.

Band 10 and Band 11. Work 30 sc across each row.

Band 12. Work 35 sc across each row. Block the squares to the same size.

Putting it All Together

To make the back of the sweater, ar­range two Log Cabin No.1 and two Log Cabin No. 2 blocks as shown in Fig. 2. Slip-stitch them together, working from the right side. Be sure to crochet through both loops.

Yoke: With the right side of the work facing you, attach burgundy (F) at the up­per right corner. Ch 1.

Row 1. Pick up and work 70 sc across the top edge of the piece. Ch 1, and turn.

Row 2. Work even in sc (70 sc), mark­ing the 23rd sc with a safety pin. Ch 1, and turn.

Now it's time to shape the right shoulder.

Row 1. Sc in each of the first 23 sc. Ch 1, and turn.

Rows 2-5. Work even in sc (23 sc). Ch 1, and turn. End the section off after com­pleting the last sc in Row 5.

Once that's done, it's time to form the left shoulder. With the right side of the work facing you, attach burgundy (F) along the top edge at the pin marker. Ch 1.

Row 1. Working along the upper left corner, pick up and work 23 sc along the top edge. Ch 1, and turn.

Rows 2-5. Work even in sc (23 sc), ch 1, and turn. End the section off after com­pleting the last sc in Row 5.

Assemble the front part of the sweater in the same manner as you did the back.

The Finishing Touches

Slip-stitch the shoulder seams together working from the right side. Be sure to crochet through the inner loops only. Then complete the following steps.

Right side edging: With the right side of the work facing you, attach burgundy (F) at the lower right corner of the back section. Ch 1.

Row 1. Pick up and work 150 sc along the side edge of the back and front sec­tions. Ch 1, and turn.

Rows 2-3. Work even in sc (150 sc). Ch 1, and turn.

Row 4. Work even in sc (150 sc). Mark the 51st and 100th stitches of the row with safety pins. End off.

Left side edging: Work as for the right side edging, except attach the yarn at the lower left corner of the front section.

Right sleeve: With the right side of the work facing you, attach burgundy (F) at the pin marker along the right side edge of the back section. Ch 1.

Row 1. Working along the right side edge of the back and front sections, make 50 sc between the two pin markers. Ch 1, and turn.

Rows 2-20. Work even in sc (50 sc). Ch 1, and turn.

Left sleeve: Work as for the right sleeve, except attach the yarn at the pin marker along the left side edge of the front section. Once the left sleeve is finished, slip-stitch the side and underarm seams through the inner loops only.

Neck edging: With the right side of the work facing you, attach burgundy (F) along the neck edge at the right shoulder seam. Ch 1.

Round 1. Pick up and work 5 sc along the right back shoulder. Work 24 sc along the back neck edge. Work 10 sc along the left shoulder. Work 24 sc along the front neck edge. Work 5 sc along the right front shoulder. There should be a total of 68 sc around the neck edge. Mark the last sc of the round with a safety pin. (As you com­plete the last sc of each succeeding round, remove the pin marker and reinsert it in the new stitch just formed.)

Round 2. Sc in each of the first 3 sc and (work the next 2 sc together) two times. Sc in each of the next 20 sc and (work the next 2 sc together) two times. Sc in each of the next 6 sc and (work the next 2 sc to­gether) two times. Sc in each of the next 20 sc and (work the next 2 sc together) two times. Sc in each of the next 3 sc. You should have made a total of 60 sc.

Round 3. Sc in each of the first 3 sc, work the next 2 sc together. Sc in each of the next 20 sc, work the next 2 sc together. Sc in each of the next 6 sc, work the next 2 sc together. Sc in each of the next 20 sc, work the next 2 sc together. Sc in each of the next 3 sc. You should have made a to­tal of 56 sc. End off.

The lower edging: With the right side of the work facing you, attach bur­gundy (F) along the bottom edge at a side seam. Ch 1.

Round 1. Pick up and work 156 sc around the bottom edge. Mark the last sc of the round with a safety pin. Be sure, as mentioned before, to remove the pin marker and reposition it in the new stitch whenever you've completed the last sc of a round.

Round 2. *Work first 2 sc together, sc in each of the next 2 sc. Repeat from * all the way around the sweater. You should wind up with 117 sc in Round 2.

Rounds 3-6. Work even in sc to obtain 117 sc.

Round 7. Work even in sc (117 sc). Slip-stitch into the first stitch of the round and end off.

Well-or whew-you're finished! You can weave any remaining yarn ends into the back of the work and block the gar­ment lightly with a steam iron if neces­sary. Then pull your piece of colorful con­temporary Americana on . . . and give your friends a show! 

Need a refresher on the basics of knitting and crocheting? Would a list of abbreviations be handy? How about more project ideas and patterns? See How to Knit and Crochet


EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was adapted with permission of the author from Crocheting Patchwork Patterns: 23 Granny Squares for Afghans, Sweaters & Other Projects. 


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