Build a Log-Lifting Tool

Build a log-lifting tool using these step-by-step instructions. Besides being a simple hand truck for hauling heavy logs, it also serves as a sawbuck to hold timber while you cut the log to stove-size lengths.


| September/October 1982



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It's more, you see, than a simple hand truck for hauling the heavy ones. It's also able to serve as a sawbuck . . . to hold a hunk of timber while you cut the log to stove-size lengths.


PHOTO: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF

Build a log-lifting tool to help you cut lumber and move heavy logs around the homestead. (See the log lifter photos in the image gallery.)

Build a Log-Lifting Tool

Folks who make the switch to wood heat often find that their saving in fuel cost is tempered by the extra effort involved in cutting, splitting, hauling, and stacking the cumbersome combustible. Still, the pleasure of tending a crackling fire — and the sense of independence that burning a renewable fuel can offer — generally makes it pretty easy to overlook the inconveniences.

There's no reason, though, why you can't make your wood harvesting chores a little less bothersome . . . and the log-lifting tool featured will help you do just that! It's more, you see, than a simple hand truck for hauling the heavy ones. It's also able to serve as a sawbuck. . . to hold a hunk of timber while you cut the log to stove-size lengths.

We made our lifter from 1-1/4 inch square tubular steel, assorted pieces of flat stock, and some garden tractor wheels. It would be a simple matter, though — if you didn't have these components on hand — to build your own version of the worksaver by simply using the dimensions given as a guide and substituting more common round tubing for the square steel . . . and replacing the tractor wheels with rollers of your choice.

The first step in any workshop undertaking, of course, is to gather the tools you'll need to complete the project. This one will require a welder, a hacksaw, a ruler, a protractor, and a power drill with a variety of bits.

Naturally, you'll also have to collect the necessary frame materials. When consolidated, these work out to 21 feet of 1-1/4 inch square tubular steel (with 14-gauge wall), a 3/8 inch by 1-1/2 inch by 40 inch length of flat stock, another piece of metal strap measuring 1/4 inches by 2 inches by 52 inches, a 1/4 inch by 5-1/2 inch by 15 inch plate, and a 1/8 inch by 1-1/2 inch by 28 inch piece of flat stock.

heidi hunt_2
1/3/2008 1:19:57 PM

The illustration is in the Image Gallery at the top right of the article.


sam_24
1/3/2008 11:28:50 AM

Where is the illustration mentioned in the article? "cut the full-length steel sections to the sizes indicated in our illustration"






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