Green Transportation

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4/16/2014

Bicycles parked at MOTHER EARTH NEWS headquarters.Perhaps this will be the year you'll stop thinking about bike commuting and will ride your bicycle to work during National Bike Month in May. Sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, this month-long event encourages velo-commuting across the United States through local activities scheduled during Bike to Work Week from May 12 to 16, and Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 16, 2014.

Bike commuting has taken off in this country, with many thousands of people reporting that they pedal to work at least occasionally, if not frequently. The population of U.S. bike commuters grew by more than 47 percent from 2000 to 2011, and the number of trips made by bicycle more than doubled during the same time period, according to the National Household Travel Survey conducted by the Federal Highway Administration. Biking to work is perceived as practical and efficient by people who live within a few miles of their workplace — which is about half of us.

The rise in bike commuting is helping to reduce traffic congestion and air pollution in North American cities, as well as saving riders money on transportation costs. And bicyclists typically enjoy better physical and mental health than drivers. As Andy Clarke, President of the League of American Bicyclists, explains, “Biking to work is an efficient and fun way to get the exercise you need, without having to find extra time to work out.”

Held every year since 1956, the Bike to Work celebration focuses on attracting and encouraging new riders to the activity. More riders on the streets helps to increase motorists' awareness of bicyclists. And cycling with others reduces the anxiety felt by new riders, who become more willing to bike to work on their own. The League's research shows that many people who participate in Bike to Work Day for the first time begin biking to work regularly thereafter.

Communities across the country sponsor Bike to Work events tailored to meet the needs and interests of their local bike commuters. You can find everything from cycling classes to commuter convoys listed in the League's Bike to Work database. Find ideas for planning activities in your own community by consulting these League publications: Getting Started: National Bike Month Guide (pdf) and Plan a Bike Month Event.

The MOTHER EARTH NEWS bicycle rack — next to the EV plug-in station — is already being used by our staff commuters in anticipation of Bike to Work Week. Won't you join us in commemorating National Bike Month by pedaling to your own workplace in May?

Rebecca Martin is an Associate Editor at MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, where her beats include DIY and Green Transportation. She's an avid cyclist and has never met a vegetable she didn't like. You can find her on Google+ and Twitter.



4/15/2014

bike  lanesThis is a modified version of a guest post written by Zach O’Connor, Communications and Publications Coordinator for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), for Adventure Cycling Association’s Building the U.S. Bicycle Route System blog. I thought it worth sharing, with the author’s permission, on the Green Transportation blog. In it Zach explains how his coworker’s multi-modal bicycle commute from the suburbs to the heart of Washington, D.C., makes use of the District’s newly improved bicycle facilities.

Most of us commute to work in our own way, whether it’s by bike, car, walking, mass transit, or a combination of two or more of these. My commute is boring compared to those of some of my co-workers at AASHTO; I walk to my nearest Metro station, transfer downtown, and walk to the office. I pass by two Capital Bikeshare (DC’s awesome bike share system) stations on my way to work. I could use this method; however, I tend to be a bit of a transit nerd and enjoy taking Metro. AASHTO Communications Director Lloyd Brown’s commute is far more adventurous.

Lloyd commutes to work from his home in Bethesda, a Maryland suburb. At least twice a week he’ll commute by bike all the way to AASHTO’s headquarters in DC. The District has recently become known for investing in bicycle infrastructure, but how do the suburbs score? It all depends where you live.

Lloyd will leave his home and take Old Georgetown Road to either the Metro or, on the days he bicycles all the way to the office, to the Capital Crescent Bike Trail. This first leg on Old Georgetown Road is where he feels he’s taking his life into his hands, as he rides 3.5 miles on this four-lane highway full of potholes and traffic. It can be risky for a cyclist during any time of the day. Once he reaches downtown Bethesda, Lloyd is able to hop on the Capital Crescent Trail, a rail-to-trail project that is a backbone of transportation for pedestrians and bicycle commuters. The trail, which serves more than a million bikers and walkers a year, ends in Georgetown, where Lloyd will utilize the city’s bike lanes for the rest of his commute.

Although DC’s bike lane network is extensive, Lloyd has noticed some problems with both cyclists and motorists. “Cars don’t make it easy for bikes, but bikes don’t make it any easier for cars,” he says. On occasion he’ll see both drivers and bicyclists ignoring signals, while car drivers often ignore bikes on the road. The DC government banned U-turns on Pennsylvania Avenue, where there is a two-way dedicated bike lane in the middle of the street. There have been blog articles, videos, and photos posted of cars breaking the law, and thankfully their actions come with the consequences of a hefty fine. But there is equal blame to go around. On the bike trail into DC, Lloyd often wishes cyclists would show one another some common courtesy, such as alerting other riders when turning or passing another rider.

This isn’t a car vs. bike scenario, but more commuter vs. commuter. The point is to be courteous, no matter which modes of transportation you utilize. That way we can all reach our destination—the weekend—safely.

Photo by Elvert Barnes



4/7/2014

So, I have been driving the C-MAX Energi from Ford Motor Company, I am getting a 23-27 mile state of charge. However, these miles do not degrade as quickly as when I got the car. I think the dealership did not refresh the batteries or it is a car right out of Detroit to Manhattan to my house.

However, the hubbub is I got 42 miles for a charge once for the C-MAX Energi. It’s staying now at the 20’s but they are more reliable 20’s. I think there might be some glitches with the controller and batteries. Also, people need to refresh these batteries. Refreshing batteries means to drain the electric vehicle and even hybrid electric battery packs get drained all the way down. It keeps the integrity of the batteries in check and assures a real range that’s equal to your driving style.

After speaking in 2013 with the head of the Eco gauges from Ford the C-MAX Energi, he explained that the smart gauge gave me a range related to my driving patterns. 

In the right cluster, redesigned imagery of green leaves shows overall driving efficiency. The left cluster shows Brake Coach, a feature that helps drivers optimize their use of the regenerative braking system so that driving range can be enhanced through proper braking techniques.

As I reported in 2012:

C-MAX Energi also has a feature called EV+ that allows for the vehicle to stay in electric-only mode for longer durations by learning frequent destinations. The feature was developed in response to Ford research that found drivers prefer to have their vehicles be in electric-only mode whenever possible, Davis explained. “C-MAX is Ford’s first hybrid-dedicated nameplate in North America, but the ability to offer features like EV+ indicates just how deep our level of understanding and expertise is when it comes to hybrids,” said Davis.

Here is one of my videos on the test drive.

More to come!

For more test drives and stories, please visit me at GreenLivingGuy.com.



4/2/2014

April bicycling in Grand Teton National Park

One of the best—albeit not the warmest—times of year to bicycle in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks is during the month of April.

As you can see by clicking on this link, bicycling and other means of non-motorized travel—in-line skating, walking, etc.—may be enjoyed in the world's first national park on the roads between West Yellowstone and Mammoth Hot Springs in April. The South Entrance road and part of the East Entrance road are also open to bicycles (while closed to cars), as conditions allow. The dates depend on the severity of the preceding winter and other factors; or, as the National Park Service puts it, “The first day of ‘spring bicycling’ is never predetermined and is dependent on road conditions as determined by park staff.”

To the south of Yellowstone, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the Teton Park Road becomes one of the world’s great bike paths in April (the road opens to motor traffic on May 1). Serious plowing began this year on March 24, with rotary plows clearing the way between Moose Junction and Jackson Lake Junction, a distance of about 20 miles … 20 miles of smooth, traffic-free pavement serving up some of the most spectacular mountain views on Earth. After this past winter’s prolific snowfall, the banks will be high, but the road will be dry (for the most part).

Please note this caveat from the Park Service: “Although the Teton Park Road will open to non-motorized use, visitors should be alert for park vehicles that may occasionally travel the road for administrative purposes and for snow plowing operations that continue as a result of recurring snowstorms. … As a reminder, entrance stations are operating and collecting fees.”

Come prepared to bundle up, although there's always the chance of hitting it on an unusually warm and sunny, western Wyoming spring day. If so, enjoy!



3/11/2014

South Dakota Family Overnight

In January 2011 Adventure Cycling Association launched a website initiative called BikeOvernights.org. Subtitled “Don’t wait to go cross country — go overnight,” the site is designed to provide inspiration, resources, and route ideas for short bicycle tours, generally just one or two nights out. Of the more than 175 destination stories that have posted at the site to date, a large share are tagged as "Family" rides. Some of the titles reveal their family orientation; e.g., “Four Days with an Almost 4-Year-Old,” “Little Elbow to Mount Romulus–A Girl’s Adventure with Grammy,” and “Hood Canal Loop: A Teen’s First Tour.” 

One of the attractive aspects of these rides is that for most folks, a quick bike overnight doesn’t require a lot of travel to get to the trailhead. In many cases, they can begin and end right at the front door. Consider these words from Elle Steele Bustamante, who wrote Our First-Ever Family Weekend of Wonderfulness

“On this, our first overnighter, we rode up to Beal’s Point on Folsom Lake, about 30 miles from Sacramento. It was the first time bike camping with our little ones. Amazing! It’s great to know that there are adventures so close to home. Really, picture a nearby campground. You probably wouldn’t ever think to camp there as, let’s face it, your own bed is much more comfortable. However, getting there by bike with all your gear strapped to the back—that’s wonderfully worthwhile.” 

Wonderfully worthwhile indeed. A bike overnight is the ideal introduction to bicycle travel for young and old alike. Visit www.BikeOvernights.org to read some of these inspiring stories, then share with a friend or family member! 

Or, for something a little longer, you might consider dipping your toes into the touring waters by joining one of Adventure Cycling’s special family tours: Family Fun, Erie Canal; Family Fun, Great Allegheny Passage; Family Fun, Idaho; or Family Fun, Minnesota–Paul Bunyan Trail. You can read all about them by clicking on this link.



2/27/2014
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The zippy folding e-bike shown in this video would be perfect for anyone with a short commute. It goes 20 miles on one charge, at speeds up to 15 mph, and it folds down to fit in your trunk or at your feet on a bus or train. A brilliant idea, coming soon to cities everywhere if the developers can raise enough funds. What better way to fight back against Big Oil than to help create cleaner renewable transportation choices? We won’t be posting many IndieGoGo projects here, but this one seems well worth supporting. Learn more at URB-E.


Cheryl Long is the editor in chief of MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, and a leading advocate for more sustainable lifestyles. She leads a team of editors which produces high quality content that has resulted in MOTHER EARTH NEWS being rated as one North America’s favorite magazines. Long lives on an 8-acre homestead near Topeka, Kan., powered in part by solar panels, where she manages a large organic garden and a small flock of heritage chickens. Prior to taking the helm at MOTHER EARTH NEWS, she was an editor at Organic Gardening magazine for 10 years. Connect with her on .



2/25/2014

MAX105TaxEmblem.jpg

If you've done a vegetable oil conversion, or built a vegetable oil car from the ground up (like I did with MAX), or make your own biodiesel from waste vegetable oil, you still have a legal (and ethical, IMHO) responsibility to pay your per-gallon fuel tax. But depending on where you live, it may not be easy.

My native Oregon has a well earned reputation as a progressive state (with some embarrassing late starts—seriously, we didn't ratify the 15th Amendment until 1959) and one area where we've been ahead of the pack is road taxes. What that? You don't like road taxes? You don't like the fees for vehicle registration? You don't like gas taxes? Oh yes you do, because that's what pays for the infrastructure that makes driving possible—the asphalt, the bridges, the traffic lights—and one side effect of improving fuel efficiency is a reduction of road tax revenue.

Back in Ye Olde Days (the early 1900s) the biggest supporters of road taxes were car owners and auto clubs. The horse-and-buggy folks were pretty content with what they had, but “automobilists” wanted better roads and (for the most part) recognized that the users should be the ones to pay for them. And hey, us Oregonians led the way, with a gasoline tax in 1919, and a dozen years later, the feds decided that was a good idea and initiated a national gas tax. We also have a weight-mile tax for over-the-highway trucks, since an 80,000 pound 18 wheeler put more wear on the road than a fuel tax would cover.

We humans are pretty good at rationalizing why what's good for us personally is The Right Thing To Do. I'm quite comfortable with fuel tax, myself, and feel like I'm paying My Fair Share at the pump even though it's about a quarter of what other folks typically pay per mile. My justification? MAX's road maintenance costs are about a quarter of a typical car; MAX only weighs 1300 pounds and only has 32 horsepower, it's sure no asphalt wrinkler.

Alternative Fuel User

Nevertheless, something should be done about alternative fuel vehicles, and I'm not ready to say “Gosh, maybe the electric guys should be paying their share of road tax,” (which I personally think should be higher than MAX's share because the EVs tend to be heavier and more powerful than MAX and thus do more damage to the roads—see what I mean about rationalizing?) until I can claim the moral high ground. And I can't claim it yet, because just like EV drivers in Oregon pay no fuel tax when they plug their car into the wall, I pay no fuel tax when I buy cooking oil from Costco or 7-11 or Safeway or Kroger's.

When it goes in MAX's tank, it turns into what the Oregon Department of Transportation calls a “use fuel” (“use”, noun, with 's' pronounced like in snake, not like the s in bees), and the ODOT has a system for that, and they were happy to send me the necessary applications so I could get an official Use Fuel User License. And mail in my fuel tax every month. Plus send them a deposit in lieu of bond should I fail to mail my monthly fuel tax. And request a Use Fuel Vehicle Emblem (see the graphic at the beginning of this article, which is just the emblem header so don't get any ideas about photo shopping your own Emblem).

The paperwork, though weighty, is no tougher than an 8th Grade book report...but it's tailored for big fuel users and ODOT doesn't have a lot of 100 MPG grease burners on the books so the default deposit is a hundred bucks. Gulp. I sent them some eloquent emails and a link to a Mother Earth News MAX story, and they decided a tenner, which is good for 33 gallons of veggie oil, would be enough to keep me honest.

So we'll see how this goes. I'm going to have to keep fuel use and travel records much like a big rig trucker, and mail ODOT a monthly check, but I'll get to sleep without a guilty conscience so it will all be worth it. Besides, I can hardly wait to take my Use Fuel Vehicle Emblem to Safeway.









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